Western Force and Coach Graham part ways

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “Richard has given a lot of himself to the Emirates Western Force and rugby in WA and for that we are grateful.  The ruling by the Board was an eventuality he was prepared for off the back of his announcement earlier in the week.  We acknowledge his effort and we will part amicably,” Reid said. PERTH, AUSTRALIA – JANUARY 10: Richard Graham instruct his players during a Western Force Super Rugby training session at UWA Sports Park on January 10, 2011 in Perth, Australia. (Photo by Paul Kane/Getty Images) Graham leaving the Force for its rivals the RedsThe Western Force will see out the remainder of the 2012 season under a new coaching structure after the RugbyWA Board today informed Richard Graham he would be stood down as Head Coach with immediate effect.Following the announcement earlier this week that Graham had triggered a clause in his contract allowing him to move to rival franchise Queensland next year, the RugbyWA Board sought and received feedback from a range of stakeholders including the playing group.Graham announced earlier this week he would be heading to Queensland next season on a three-year deal to replace Ewen McKenzie, who will become coaching director of the Super Rugby champions.For the club’s remaining eight matches this season a coaching panel of Nick Stiles, Phil Blake and Andrew Scotney will manage the load, with additional resources and input being provided by Captain David Pocock and club legend Nathan Sharpe.“The Board has determined that a change to the coaching structure is for the betterment of the Emirates Western Force with still half a season to play in 2012,” Chief Executive Officer Vern Reid said.  “The decision has come about after a carefully considered and consultative approach.“The Board put in place a clear process to determine the appropriate course of action and met regularly to receive feedback from key stakeholders.  The result is that a firm and informed decision in the best interests of the Emirates Western Force has been taken. The search for a new Head Coach is progressing well with more than 30 applicants already putting forward their interest in the position.  A number of other highly credentialed and experienced coaches have been invited to apply.Referencing checking of the shortlisted candidates will begin early next week.last_img read more

Church of England resumes women bishops debate

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska [Episcopal News Service] The key legislation that will enable women to be appointed and consecrated as bishops in the Church of England has returned to General Synod for further debate and final drafting during its Feb. 6-9 group of sessions in London.During the past 18 months the legislation has been given the nod by 42 of the 44 diocesan synods throughout England, but it now requires a two-thirds majority in each of the three houses of General Synod – bishops, clergy and laity – for it to be adopted. At least one third of members are new to synod since the July 2010 debate when the measure was first approved in its current form.Also since that debate, a draft Code of Practice has been drawn up outlining provisions for those opposed to women’s ordination, such as providing male alternatives for traditionalists unable to accept the authority of a female bishop. The draft code can only be formalized and further debated by synod once the measure has been passed. Should the legislation not be amended during its current meeting, the measure is expected to come before synod for a final vote in July.The full text of the measure is available here.Bishop Nigel Stock of St. Edmundsbury & Ipswich, chair of the working group that prepared the draft code, delivered an opening address to synod on Feb. 7. He said that the working group had found “two knotty issues” in developing the code – how male bishops who would minister to those opposed to women bishops would be chosen and how they would function. Opponents to the code have objected that such an arrangement would undermine the ministry of women bishops and create a two-tier episcopate.Christina Rees, a lay member of General Synod and former chair of women-bishop advocacy group Women and the Church, or WATCH, asked if the working group had sought examples of good practice from other places in the Anglican Communion where women already exercise episcopal ministry, and if so what did the group discover and how did they use that information.Stock explained that the group had not explored such examples “because nowhere else [in the communion] has a measure like the one we’re proposing” and that the working group didn’t have time. “When we come to the point of implementing this [code] I think that would be fruitful,” he said.Four provinces – the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, Anglican Church of Canada, the Anglican Church of Australia, and the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia –have women serving as bishops. In addition, the extraprovincial Episcopal Church of Cuba is led by a female bishop.Eleven additional provinces have approved the ordination of women bishops but have yet to appoint or elect one.Bishop Geralyn Wolf of Rhode Island, who in 1996 became the fifth woman elected as a bishop in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, participated in a panel discussion sponsored by WATCH in London on Feb. 6 to coincide with the opening day of synod. Others on the panel included Bishop Susan Moxley of Nova Scotia, Canada, and the Rev. Rose Hudson-Wilkin, chaplain to the speaker in the U.K. House of Commons.When it was suggested that the synod debates may be perceived as archaic by many Americans, Wolf told ENS that while some may view the contents of the debate in that way, “the challenge is fresh and timely: how will we be different together? I suspect that if we could find an answer to that question we would truly experience the kingdom of God.”Assuming all stages of the legislative process proceed without delay, the first woman bishop could not be consecrated in England until at least 2014, since the measure also would require approval by the U.K. Parliament. Parliamentary approval is necessary because the measure effectively changes English law as the Church of England is an officially established Christian church with Queen Elizabeth II as its supreme governor. With the celebration of her Diamond Jubilee this year, synod members are reminded that Queen Elizabeth, a woman, has been head of the Church of England for 60 years.On Feb. 6, a motion filed in the House of Commons by Labour Member of Parliament for Birkenhead Frank Field encouraged General Synod to move forward in passing the legislation recognizing that there is “overwhelming support” for women bishops.In a separate press release, Field said that a group of MPs are calling on the Church of England to “get on with it.” The parliamentary motion, the release says, “aims to prevent members of the General Synod employing delaying tactics to prevent the decision coming to parliament for approval. Any such move will have little if any support from MPs who wish for the consecrations to proceed as quickly as possible.”The General Synod began its steady course toward allowing women in the episcopate when in July 2005 it passed a motion to remove the legal obstacles to ordaining women bishops.In July 2006, synod called for the practical and legislative arrangements of admitting women to the episcopate to be explored. It also called for the formation of a legislative drafting group to prepare a draft measure and amending canon necessary to remove the legal obstacles.At its July 2008 group of sessions, synod agreed that it was the “wish of its majority … for women to be admitted to the episcopate” and affirmed that “special arrangements be available, within the existing structures of the Church of England, for those who as a matter of theological conviction will not be able to receive the ministry of women as bishops or priests.”General Synod voted in February 2009 to send a draft measure on women bishops to a revision committee so it could rework the legislation.The revision committee met 16 times beginning in May 2009 and considered 114 submissions from synod members, and a further 183 submissions from others. In May 2010, the committee published its 142-page report, which offered a detailed analysis of the draft legislation in time for the July 2010 synod debate and vote.The long path towards accepting women’s ordained ministry in the Anglican Communion began in 1920 when the Lambeth Conference called (via Resolutions 47-52) for the diaconate of women to be restored “formally and canonically,” adding that it should be recognized throughout the communion.The first woman priest in the communion, Li Tim-Oi, was ordained in Hong Kong in 1944. Due to outside pressure she resigned her license, but not her holy orders, following World War II. In 1971, the Rev. Jane Hwang and the Rev. Joyce Bennett were ordained priests in the Diocese of Hong Kong, though their ministries were not recognized in many parts of the Anglican Communion.In 1974, there was an “irregular” ordination of 11 women in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, which officially authorized women’s priestly ordination two years later.Bishop Barbara Harris, now retired suffragan of Massachusetts, was elected in 1988 and became the Anglican Communion’s first woman bishop after her consecration and ordination in 1989.The Rt. Rev. Penelope Jamieson made history in 1989 when she was elected as bishop of the Diocese of Dunedin, New Zealand, and became the first woman to serve as a diocesan bishop in the Anglican Communion.The Rt. Rev. Mary Adelia McLeod, who was ordained a priest in 1980, was consecrated in 1993 as bishop of the Diocese of Vermont, becoming the first woman diocesan bishop in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church. She retired in 2001.The Rt. Rev. Canon Nerva Cot Aguilera became the first woman Anglican bishop in Latin America when she was consecrated bishop suffragan of the Episcopal Church of Cuba in June 2007.The Church of England opened the priesthood to women in November 1992, five years after women were first ordained to the diaconate. More than 5,000 women have been ordained as priests in England since 1994 and today they represent nearly 40 percent of all clergy.The General Synod is the national assembly of the Church of England which came into being in 1970 replacing an earlier body known as the Church Assembly. It continues a tradition of synodical government which, in England, has its origins in the medieval period.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service February 8, 2012 at 5:48 am The cry goes up how long…a decision must be made now. We need to stop making excuses fir the inertia that infects so many churches (I supplied in 30+ London churches over the period of15 mons and half were dead). Now as a parish priest in 2 rural places the synod is a blurr (if even that to my folk) and their machinations are seen as costly, wasteful and disconnected. I am present as an exhibitor and feel the whole thing prowls around like a lion seeking to devour someone. I might add that as a liberal catholic who loves Mass, Mary, Walsingham, Benediction and Confession, and rejoices in priests and bishops of all sorts that are faithful to the gospel and the Anglican tradition, not to forget their people, fully know the feeling of isolation is real for liberal as well as trad catholics. Indeed Catholics within the C of E might well introduce novenas, rosary etc as Fresh Expressions and bring it to life. Even in the villages I find people love the buildings but do not come to church, and all have reasons..usually clergy based issues. Let’s get on with it, meaning the gospel, and share the faith of Him who loves us. Jim Rosenthal Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Matthew DaviesPosted Feb 7, 2012 Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Women’s Ministry Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon Jim Rosenthal says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Church of England resumes women bishops debate Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Comments (1) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

El poder del testimonio público: las iglesias se preparan para…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Por Pat McCaughanPosted Mar 24, 2016 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Submit a Press Release El poder del testimonio público: las iglesias se preparan para llevar la Pasión a la calle Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Robert Yearwood, sacristán de la iglesia de La Trinidad, lleva la cruz a través de las calles de Boston mientras los cristianos de la zona recordaban el sufrimiento de Jesús con un desfile por las calles de la ciudad el Viernes Santo de 2015. La Rda. Rainey Dankel, también de La Trinidad, fue una de las organizadoras de las “Estaciones de la Ciudad”. Foto de Patricia Hurley.[Episcopal News Service] Este Viernes Santo, para el Rdo. Scott Slater y otros de la Diócesis de Maryland, el Vía Crucis [o Estaciones de la Cruz] incluirá una caminata a lo largo del corredor de la Ruta 40 con altos para orar en los lugares donde la violencia armada ha cobrado vidas.En todas partes de la Iglesia Episcopal, la antigua tradición de evocar el camino de Jesús a la crucifixión se observará al aire libre y de diversas maneras novedosas y públicas.En Copley Square de Boston, Matt Gin, de 29 años, se propone estar entre un grupo de la iglesia de La Trinidad [Trinity Church] que usará pantomimas y cuadros plásticos para transmitir la profundidad de la Pasión. “Estoy representando a Jesús en las últimas cinco estaciones”, dijo Gin en una entrevista reciente con Episcopal News Service.Y en Virginia, miembros del ministerio de jóvenes adultos de la iglesia de Santiago Apóstol [St. James’s Church] recorrerán las estaciones el Sábado Santo, 26 de marzo, en Belle Isle de Richmond, un sitio popular para entusiastas de las actividades al aire libre con una notable importancia histórica. El sitio de un campamento prisión para soldados de la Unión durante la guerra de Secesión sirve como un “poderoso recordatorio de que la labor de reconciliación no ha concluido aún”, según la Rda. Carmen Germino, rectora asociada.Baltimore: Una ‘impía trinidad’ de pobreza, racismo y violenciaSlater, canónigo del Ordinario en la Diócesis de Maryland, dijo que él ha pasado muchas veces en su auto por algunas zonas de Baltimore “con las puertas cerradas con seguro y la radio puesta”, pero quería caminar por la ciudad y orar siguiendo los pasos de los disturbios que se produjeron después de la muerte de Freddie Gray el año pasado y de la violencia armada que sigue cobrando vidas de jóvenes afroamericanos.Gray, de 25 años, fue arrestado el 12 de abril de 2015, acusado de portación ilegal de armas en Baltimore. Sufrió una grave lesión en la médula espinal mientras se encontraba detenido por la policía y falleció poco después. Su muerte provocó un disturbio civil y un juez anuló el juicio luego de que los jurados no pudieran alcanzar un veredicto en el proceso seguido a los primeros seis policías acusados de la muerte de Gray.Según un informe del Departamento de Justicia de EE.UU., en 2012, el barrio de Sandtown-Winchester/Harlem Park donde vivía Gray se vio asediado por “un ciclo de encarcelación, pobreza y pérdida de oportunidades”.El informe incluía algunas tristes realidades del barrio: un ingreso familiar promedio de $24.000 de 2006 a 2012; una tasa de desempleo de un 51,8 por ciento y una tasa de ausentismo escolar de casi un 50 por ciento. Aproximadamente un tercio de las propiedades residenciales están vacías o abandonadas.“La desesperanza (allí) te cala los huesos. Es palpable”, dijo Slater, quien recorrió previamente la zona para planear su conmemoración del viernes. “Una cuadra tras otra de casas clausuradas y de calles convertidas en basureros… uno se da cuenta de lo difícil que resulta crecer aquí”.El recorrido de poco más de 11 kilómetros abarca los sitios de 3 iglesias episcopales e incluye a participantes ecuménicos. A lo largo del camino, los altos para orar en 15 lugares donde jóvenes afroamericanos han muerto a tiros o debido a otras formas de violencia en el último año obligarán a los participantes a enfrentar la triste realidad de lo que “nuestro obispo (Eugene Sutton) ha llamado la impía trinidad del racismo, la pobreza y la violencia”, dijo Slater.Se planea una parada detrás de una gasolinera donde “mataron a tiros a un joven. Es un lugar horrible para morir y también un lugar horrible para vivir”, agregó. Al ver los nombres y los lugares, Slater espera hacerles a los participantes las circunstancias de las vidas y muertes contemporáneas, tanto como la de Jesús, “mucho más reales”.“Espero que el concepto de caminar a través de nuestra propia ciudad y pasar por los sitios donde personas de verdad, con nombres reales, murieron violentamente, y orar por ellos, hará la auténtica experiencia de recordar a Jesús el Viernes Santo un poco más palpable”.El Rdo. Ramelle McCall, de 34 años, rector de la iglesia de San Miguel y Todos los Ángeles [St. Michael and All Angels Church] en Baltimore, se propone unirse a la caminata de oración porque espera captar a otros “que no han visto zonas extremadamente desfavorecidas de Baltimore”.“Me sentí como si fuera un chico de la Ruta 40; yo viví durante varios años en el barrio Sandtown-Winchester”, mientras crecía, le dijo él a ENS.“Es importante concienciar a muchísima gente dentro y fuera de la Iglesia acerca de estas comunidades que necesitan ayuda. Espero que la gente que no vive en Baltimore verá como la dinámica de la socioeconomía, la raza y la clase —juntas— afectan las vidas”.McCall dijo que su iglesia está a menos de ocho kilómetros de donde Gray fue arrestado. Según se acerca el aniversario de la muerte de Gray, McCall espera que prosigan los esfuerzos “para ver si podemos fomentar algunas relaciones y ver dónde va eso”.Slater se muestra de acuerdo. Dijo que hay “un genuino apetito de personas de la diócesis que no viven en Baltimore de hacer algo tangible para relacionarse con los problemas endémicos de Baltimore”.McCall dijo que espera convertir la oración en acción. “La necesidad siempre ha existido, y estoy agradecido de que la diócesis está coordinando verdaderamente este evento”, afirmó.“Nunca habría imaginado que como sacerdote, como negro, formaría parte realmente de un grupo presumiblemente diverso que tiene un genuino interés por estas comunidades y que realmente quiere ver cómo el Espíritu puede obrar a través de todos nosotros para convertirnos en un auténtico amigo de estas zonas empobrecidas. Eso es lo que me entusiasma”.Al mismo tiempo, la caminata será un recordatorio aleccionador no sólo de “que Jesús murió por nosotros este día… sino que en algunas partes de Baltimore, la gente puede ver constantemente el Viernes Santo”, dijo McCall.“Estamos intentando realzar, en el contexto del Viernes Santo, los desafortunados homicidios que tienen lugar y las infortunadas pérdidas de vida que ocurren, y cuánto nos entristecen esas muertes”, añadió. Al mismo tiempo, “miramos a un futuro donde tal vez podamos celebrar la esperanza en medio de un Viernes Santo donde esta violencia no se repita constantemente”.“Tenemos la facultad de reescribir la narrativa, de manera que este no es un viernes al que miramos a las vidas perdidas, sino a las vidas que se salvarán en el futuro próximo”.Boston: Mimos y cuadros plásticos, ‘la mejor expresión de la evangelización episcopal’Para algunos miembros de la iglesia de La Trinidad, el reto de este Viernes Santo será expresar la Pasión en pantomimas y cuadros plásticos, mientras hacen malabarismos entre varios papeles como espectadores, partidarios, adversarios y Jesús.Mary Davis se encuentra entre los seis miembros de la iglesia que representarán a Jesús durante los últimos momentos de su vida en “un Vía Crucis viviente” en medio de las vistas y sonidos de la animada Copley Square de Boston.“Pensamos que ‘es demasiado peso que una sola persona hiciera de Jesús”, dijo Davis. “Hicimos el recorrido ayer y fue muy conmovedor. Me hizo reflexionar sobre aspectos del relato en los que nunca antes había pensado como el de estar dentro de la experiencia de una manera que era bastante novedosa. Justo durante el ensayo, me eché a llorar en varias ocasiones”.La Rda. Rita Powell, rectora asociada de La Trinidad para la liturgia, organizó la actividad con ayuda de Tony LoPresti —un profesional del teatro neoyorquino, mimo y amigo de la comunidad de Taizé— que asesoró a los actores.Los talleres con LoPresti los prepararon con los fundamentos de la mímica clásica para la representación, la cual comenzará en las gradas de la iglesia con la primera estación, en la cual Jesús es condenado a muerte. Acompañado por una pandereta, un tambor y un violín, mientras otros leen la Escritura, los actores se moverán a otras esquinas de la plaza para representar las estaciones.“Es como una intersección entre el Vía Crucis y el tipo más contemporáneo de ‘estaciones de la ciudad’, donde se transita y se ora en importantes lugares urbanos. Estamos creando cuadros vivientes de las estaciones de la cruz valiéndonos de la liturgia del Ritual para ocasiones especiales de la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo Powell.En medio de la concurrida plaza, la representación serás un recordatorio, también de que “para un pequeño grupo de personas la crucifixión de Jesús fue en verdad importante, aunque la mayor parte de la ciudad no se conmoviera por el evento”, dijo ella.Nieve, llueve o brille el sol, la representación irá tal como se planeó a las 3:30 PM hasta la última estación “donde Jesús es despojado de sus vestidos, crucificado y muerto. Eso tendrá lugar en la fuente de la calle Boylston y usaremos la hornacina de piedra que está en el pórtico frontal de la iglesia”.Para Gin, un estudiante que cursa su doctorado en Harvard, que fue bautizado en la Vigilia Pascual del año pasado y quien también hará de Jesús durante las estaciones, esa es la parte escalofriante.“Tengo que decir que no me siento del todo cómodo con hacer de Jesús en esas cinco escenas y me parece bien. No creo que alguien deba sentirse cómodo con esas escenas”.Cuando Powell se le acercó para invitarlo a participar, Gin, historiador de la arquitectura, se quedó fascinado por la mezcla de tradición antigua y novedosa interpretación.El prepararse para sus varios papeles —de partidario, adversario, ejecutor y de Jesús—, “ha sido un verdadero desafío, el tratar de ponerme no sólo en el relato sino en la mentalidad de todas esas personas. Hay una tendencia a concentrarse solamente en Jesús, pero de repente te ves confrontado con lo que pensaba ese tipo cuando envió a Jesús a la cruz. Se ha resuelto para mí de una manera nueva”Gin dijo que él realmente no estará colgando de la cruz al igual que Jesús: una aparejo especial le sostendrá el cuerpo. “Hay esta extraña tensión física en que parece que estoy colgando (de la cruz), pero mi cuerpo la sostiene”.En un ensayo anterior, él se dio cuenta de que una hermosa tensión no es más que esa condición física. Es muy incómoda. Y siendo realmente sincero, puedo ver cuán dolorosa y agónica fue realmente la muerte de Jesús. Eso no es algo en lo que a la gente le guste pensar o en lo que realmente piense. Incluso en nuestras representaciones contemporáneas prevalece la idea de un Cristo sereno en la cruz. Estar realmente en esa posición lo lleva a un nivel completamente nuevo”.También, al hacer esto “en esa plaza y forma públicas, implica a todos, ya sea que pases por el lado o que lo ignores. Eso es realmente poderoso. Seas creyente o no, hay algo significativo que se desprende no sólo de esta representación, sino de esta historia”.Davis está de acuerdo. “Se siente una verdadera alegría en hacer que esta historia cobre vida, aunque la historia misma sea de intenso sufrimiento. Así es en general como me siento en Semana Santa. En verdad es satisfactorio aunque sea realmente horrible desenterrar ese segmento de nuestra fe”.Powell dijo que el evento representa “lo mejor de la evangelización episcopal. Tomar lo que más amamos, la expresión litúrgica de lo que creemos es importante en la historia y atrevernos valientemente a decir eso en público, simplemente es portador de una fuerza y de un riesgo y de un entusiasmo que uno no puede compararlo con ninguna otra cosa”.Richmond: ‘Un influyente testimonio público’ en medio de crueles recordatorios El Sábado Santo, los miembros de la iglesia de Santiago Apóstol en Richmond, Virginia, cantarán, orarán y caminarán al tiempo que recuerden los últimos momentos de la vida terrenal de Cristo.El parque de Belle Isle y el río James, populares sitios de la ciudad, servirán de trasfondo mientras los miembros del Ministerio de Jóvenes Adultos de la iglesia, que organizaron el recorrido, hacen reflexiones en las “estaciones” marcadas por obras de arte creadas por los niños de la escuela dominical.“Es una atmósfera familiar estupenda, relajada y acogedora”, y no obstante recuerda los retos que enfrenta la ciudad, dijo Danielle Dick, de 40 años, que se propone asistir junto con Aidan, su hijo de 9 años.Los senderistas disfrutan la belleza de la escena, pero también pasan junto a las ruinas de las antiguas plantas industriales, que también nos recuerdan la historia de la isla como el sitio de un campamento de prisioneros, de tiempos de la guerra de Secesión, para soldados de la Unión. Sirve como recordatorio del “profundo impacto que aún tiene el pasado sobre el presente”, dijo ella.La Rda. Carmen Germino se mostraba de acuerdo.“Al principio, elegimos Belle Isle (como sitio para la primera caminata de este año) porque es un parque público muy conocido y querido y un lugar al aire libre en Richmond. Pero cuanto más nos metíamos en él, nos dimos cuenta del adecuado lugar teológico que era… porque en un tiempo Richmond fue la capital de la Confederación y aún seguimos viviendo en gran medida de ese legado”.Recordar la historia del parque “es un eficaz recordatorio de que la obra de reconciliación en la ciudad aún está por hacer y la Semana Santa puede ser un momento decisivo para recordar eso”.La caminata del año pasado atrajo a centenares de personas y “se asumió con un espíritu jubiloso, lo cual yo creo que es apropiado para el Sábado Santo, cuando ya hemos pasado el Viernes Santo, pero aún no salimos de las tinieblas y no obstante nos sentimos más gozosos por [la cercanía de] la Pascua”, dijo Germino.“El detenerse y comenzar, la oración y la reflexión constituyen un recordatorio de que la trayectoria continúa. Fue una mezcla agradable de experiencia y emoción, ayudó a que los niños se entusiasmaran con la Pascua”.Además, “es un testimonio público en medio de lo que usualmente no es un lugar de culto”, añadió. El carácter puramente físico del oficio apelaba a aquellos del grupo que tenían entre algo más de veinte años hasta poco más de cuarenta.“Mientras planeaban la liturgia, tenía sentido que esta tuviera lugar al aire libre. Las estaciones más convincentes que he experimentado son públicas, fuera de los muros de la iglesia, como si estuviera en Jerusalén, andando por la Vía Dolorosa”.– La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Lent Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

Jackson Ole Sapit elected as next archbishop of Kenya

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Africa, Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 People Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By Gavin DrakePosted May 20, 2016 Featured Events Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Anglican Communion, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Archbishop-elect of Kenya Jackson Ole Sapit (left) with the outgoing archbishop, Eliud Wabukala, at the opening of the new diocesan office in Kericho. Photo: Diocese of Kericho[Anglican Communion News Service] Bishop of Kericho Jackson Ole Sapit has been elected to serve as the sixth archbishop and primate of the Anglican Church of Kenya and bishop of the Diocese of All Saints’ Cathedral.The 52-year-old bishop was baptized in 1977 and confirmed eight years later. His first church role was as evangelist and community motivator in Narok, which he undertook from two years from 1987 before joining the Berea Theological College. He was ordained a deacon in July 1991 and a priest a year later.He served as vicar of Belgut Parish in the Diocese of Nakuru and then as vicar of Kilgoris Parish and project manager at Transmara Rural Development Programme.Throughout this time he continued his education, gaining a Bachelor of Divinity degree from St. Paul’s University in Nairobi and a Certificate in Research and Consultancy at Nairobi’s Daystar University. In 1997, he studied for an M.A. in Social Development and Sustainable Livelihoods at the U.K.’s University of Reading.He returned to Kenya to take up the role of mission and development coordinator for the Diocese of Nakuru, before serving as the suffragan bishop of the Kericho area becoming diocesan bishop when the area was carved out of Nakuru diocese to become a diocese in its own right.In 2012, he was awarded a Doctorate of Professional Studies by the Global University for Lifelong Learning in California, U.S.A profile published by the Anglican Church of Kenya in advance of the May 20 election says that Sapit “managed to nurture the young Diocese of Kericho” both in spiritual terms and in community development.It describes how the archbishop-elect mobilized local and international resources to transform communities, improve food security and enable economic empowerment. He has established a number of health clinics in the new diocese and is passionate about sustainable development.He has held a number of other roles both within dioceses and the provincial structures of the Anglican Church of Kenya. From time to time, Sapit has been called upon to manage conflicts within the church and community at large.The current Archbishop of Kenya, the Most Rev. Eliud Wabukala, retires on June 26. Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Jackson Ole Sapit elected as next archbishop of Kenyalast_img read more

Se aceptan ahora solicitudes para la Presencia Oficial de la…

first_imgSe aceptan ahora solicitudes para la Presencia Oficial de la Juventud en la Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal 2018 Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 General Convention 2018, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Aug 16, 2017 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Youth & Young Adults General Convention, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA [16 de agosto de 2017] Ya se aceptan solicitudes de estudiantes de secundaria que quieran participar en la Presencia Oficial de la Juventud en la Convención General (GCOYP, por su sigla en inglés) en la 79ª. Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal que tendrá lugar desde el jueves 5 hasta el viernes 13 de julio de 2018 en el Centro de Convenciones de Austin, Austin, Texas (Diócesis de Texas).Las solicitudes e información al respecto se encuentran aquí. El formulario de nominación se encuentra aquí. “En cada Convención General, esperamos recibir a los miembros de la Presencia Oficial de la Juventud en la Cámara de Diputados”, dijo la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados. “Las perspectivas y experiencias de los estudiantes de escuela secundaria son fundamentales para nuestras deliberaciones legislativas y animan más nuestros debates”.“Desde 1982, las resoluciones de la Convención General ofrecen [un espacio] a una Presencia Oficial de la Juventud”, señaló Bronwyn Clark Skov, directora de la Iglesia Episcopal para los ministerios de Formación, Juventud y Jóvenes Adultos, cuya oficina, junto con la Oficina de la Convención General y de la presidente Jennings, coordina los procesos de solicitud y discernimiento para los adolescentes que aspiran a ser miembros de la OYP. “Conforme a las actuales Reglas de Orden de la Cámara de Diputados, a los miembros de la OYP se les concede asiento y voz en esa cámara”.Skov explicó que no se seleccionarán más que a dos jóvenes de secundaria de cada una de las nueve provincias de la Iglesia Episcopal.CriteriosPara tener derecho a solicitar, los candidatos deben reunir los siguientes criterios:• Ser miembro activo y comulgante regular de una congregación de la Iglesia Episcopal.• Tener por lo menos 16 años de edad y no más de 19 durante la Convención General de 2018.• Ser en la actualidad estudiante de escuela secundaria que curse el 9º., 10º., 11º. o 12º. grados durante el año escolar 2017/18.• Poder viajar solo/a por avión o ferrocarril de ida y regreso a las reuniones en Estados Unidos sin precisar de acompañante.• Estar dispuesto/a a concurrir a la [reunión] obligatoria de orientación y adiestramiento del 5 al 8 de abril de 2018 en Austin. Este fin de semana incluye desarrollo comunitario, culto y adiestramiento en el proceso legislativo.• Poder estar presente en la Convención General en Austin del 2 al 13 de julio de 2018.El presupuesto de la Iglesia Episcopal costea los gastos de viaje, alojamiento y comidas de los participantes de la OYP que asistan al fin de semana de orientación y a la Convención General.La fecha límite para solicitudes y nominaciones es el 1 de noviembre. Todos los solicitantes deben identificar a un nominador que no sea miembro de su familia y que pueda redactar un ensayo vía Internet en el formulario de nominación a más tardar el 1 de noviembre [del año en curso].Las solicitudes serán revisadas por un comité que incluye al vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados, Byron Rushing, de Massachusetts; a la diputada Ariana González Bonillas, de Arizona; a miembros del Consejo de Liderazgo de la Red del Ministerio de la Juventud y a personal del Departamento de Formación.A los nominadores se les contactará a principios de enero y a los solicitantes se les notificará su estatus en febrero. El equipo de la Presencia Oficial de la Juventud se dará a conocer en marzo.Las preguntas deben dirigirse a Skov en [email protected] o en el 646-242-1421.Convención GeneralLa Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal se celebra cada tres años para deliberar los asuntos legislativos de la Iglesia. La Convención General es el organismo bicameral que gobierna la Iglesia, compuesta de la Cámara de Obispos, con un número creciente de 200 obispos activos y jubilados, y la Cámara de Diputados, con más de 800 diputados clérigos y laicos electos, provenientes de las 109 diócesis y tres zonas regionales de la Iglesia. Entre convenciones, la Convención General continúa funcionando a través de sus comités y comisiones. El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General. Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

Ya está disponible el Resumen de las Acciones de la…

first_imgYa está disponible el Resumen de las Acciones de la 79.a Convención General Posted Aug 15, 2018 [15 de agosto de 2018] El Rdo. Canónigo Michael Barlowe, secretario de la Convención General, ha anunciado que el Resumen de las acciones de la 79.a Convención General está ahora disponible en línea en el sitio web de la Convención General, aquí.Puede acceder al texto de las resoluciones en la sección de las resoluciones de la carpeta virtual, aquí: vbinder.net.El Resumen de las acciones de la 79.a Convención General presenta los resultados de las resoluciones y la membresía del Consejo Ejecutivo como también otras elecciones y nombramientos hechos durante la 79.a Convención General, que se llevó a cabo el 5-13 de julio de 2018 en Austin, Texas. Este documento está en cumplimiento con el requisito del Reglamento de Orden Conjunto V.15 de la Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal.El registro diario de la 79.a Convención, que es el registro oficial de las actas, estará disponible comenzando en el 2019.Si tiene preguntas acerca del Resumen de las Acciones de la 79. a Convención General comuníquese con [email protected] Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH General Convention 2018 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY last_img read more

Northwest Pennsylvania ministry meets unspoken needs, providing tampons, diapers, wipes

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA COVID-19, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Tags Health & Healthcare Northwest Pennsylvania ministry meets unspoken needs, providing tampons, diapers, wipes TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Dioceses of Northwest Pennsylvania and Western New York] When she first realized that her church, like others across the country, would be closing its doors during the COVID-19 pandemic, Jenn Campbell of Trinity Memorial Episcopal Church in Warren, Pennsylvania, thought first of the clients of her diapers and feminine hygiene ministry.“I broke into tears,” she said. “And it wasn’t me I was worried about, it was the recipients. I’m thinking, if they can’t come in, how do I meet their needs? People need diapers whether there’s COVID-19 or not.”The Diapers & Such Ministry helps people in Warren County who are in need of toilet paper, feminine hygiene items and disposable baby diapers. Started six years ago, the program served 100 families in 2019.“It was born out of my own personal struggles,” Campbell said. “I don’t have kids, but I’ve lived in poverty pretty much my entire adult life because I have a permanent disability. I see my family and friends that struggle to afford diapers. And for me personally, I struggled to afford feminine products, and I thought, I wonder if there’s anybody out there who helps with this?”She contacted the local Salvation Army office and a local pregnancy support center, both of which were well aware of the needs she described. “They said, ‘you’ll probably be inundated if you start this.’ That was kind of the general consensus. Everybody said, ‘Yes there’s a need, and we get requests, but we can’t meet the need.’ And that was kind of the final straw. I said, OK, nobody in town’s doing this, I’m going to see if I can make it happen.”Next, Campbell approached Trinity’s vicar, the Rev. Matthew Scott. “I told him my basic idea was to collect and distribute diapers, wipes, toilet paper, basic necessities that can’t be bought with food stamps or WIC benefits,” Campbell said, referring to Women, Infants and Children, the federally-supported supplemental nutrition program.Scott said he was “floored” to learn of the restrictions that prevented women from buying such essential items. “When I heard this, I had two young children who were out of diapers at that point, and I was just horrified,” he said. “Jenn developed a ministry pretty rapidly. She has this ability to deliver and to communicate.”Presented initially at Trinity’s annual meeting, the idea for the ministry did not take off with the congregation right way. Campbell was persistent, however, and eventually used her own birthday as an opportunity to raise the initial funds for the project.“I bought a birthday cake and brought it to church and said, If you donate something you can have a piece of cake,” she said. “The response was tremendous. It was overwhelmingly tremendous. And I pretty much fully stocked the ministry and was ready to go at the end of that day.”Before the pandemic, the parish placed signs outside the church once a week, and clients were able to walk in, provide basic information and receive whatever they needed. When COVID-19 hit, Campbell asked Scott if the ministry should be put on hold. Scott was not sure. “But after talking to the bishop, I decided this was actually a life-sustaining ministry, and we can find ways to do our best to provide it,” he said.Looking for a safe way to continue, Campbell found a Facebook Group called Helping Hands of Warren County. She asked the group administrator if she could post an item about Diapers and Such. “And the person that owns the group replied and said, ‘I tell you what, I’ll donate a couple hours a week to do deliveries.’ So I went back to Matthew and said, I have a volunteer who’s willing to do delivery, and he knows the area.”People in need of diapers (and such) can contact the parish by phone to arrange a delivery. As Warren County moves into the yellow phase of Pennsylvania’s reopening plan, modified in-person service may resume, either at the church door or curbside when the weather is right, Scott said.Reflecting on the people who come to her for basic necessities like toilet paper, Campbell wonders how the pandemic will affect her ministry as more people in Warren County face financial hardship. “I think about how people that have money and have lived comfortably for a while, who may have suddenly found themselves basically in my shoes or possibly worse off,” she said. “There are people who’ve lost jobs and they’ve never been in this situation in their life.”While Campbell is thrilled that her ministry has continued during the pandemic, the joy is tinged with sadness. “There was that feeling of disconnect because for the last six years before COVID-19, I literally interacted with every single person face-to-face,” she said. “I got to know a little bit about their families and their struggles and some of their stories. And I see these people that look like they’re trampled by life.“I start by asking basic questions about what they need, and then I give them a bag and they say, ‘You’re giving me all this?’ People are so grateful, even though it’s not a lot. I love what I do. I wouldn’t trade it for the world. I knew there was a need when I started, but I didn’t fully realize how deep the need was.” Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted May 15, 2020 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

Absalom Jones Center webinar laments two pandemics: COVID-19 and systemic…

first_img Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Racial Justice & Reconciliation Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 By Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 3, 2020 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Absalom Jones Center webinar laments two pandemics: COVID-19 and systemic racism ‘No expendable people in this country’ Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group George Floyd, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Panelists participated via Zoom in the June 2 Absalom Jones Episcopal Center for Racial Healing’s final in a series of three webinars focused on public expressions of collective grief as a path to healing. Screenshot: Pat McCaughan[Episcopal News Service] Atlanta Bishop Robert C. Wright, during a June 2 online webinar, said the nation’s eight days of protest and civil unrest are the result “of denying the pain of an entire group of people since 1619” when the first African slaves arrived on America’s shores.His remarks came during “A Cry to God Together: Lament in the Midst of COVID-19,” the third and final webinar in a series about public expressions of collective grief as a path to healing. About 1,300 Episcopalians from across the church participated in the series, hosted by the Absalom Jones Episcopal Center for Racial Healing, in the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta, Georgia.Executive Director Catherine Meeks said the June 2 webinar intentionally focused on Native and Latino Americans, in general, and the so-called “forgotten” but now deemed essential people in particular: agricultural and sanitation workers, caregivers, cooks and delivery people, whose continued employment makes them vulnerable to contracting COVID-19.“We want to say to them that we don’t have any expendable people in this country. We don’t have any people we can throw away. We’ve got to stop thinking that way,” Meeks said.Wright, a panelist, said lament is both revolutionary and necessary to generate healing. Protests have swept the country and spread worldwide since the May 25 killing of George Floyd, 46, an unarmed black man who died after being pinned to the ground by police with an officer’s knee to his neck in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The police officer, Derek Chauvin, faces a second-degree murder charge and three other officers have been charged with aiding and abetting murder as of June 3.Other panelists included Roxana Chicas, a nurse and postdoctoral fellow at Emory University whose research on cooling interventions has helped protect farmworkers from heat-related illness while working in extreme conditions; the Rev. Brad Hauff, The Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries; and the Rev. Isaiah Brokenleg, the church’s staff officer for racial reconciliation.‘They bring us fresh fruit and vegetables’Webinar panelists linked systemic racism and its aftereffects — poverty, unemployment, and lack of access to education and health care — with chronic disease and other conditions that lead to COVID-19 vulnerability.Chicas aims to raise awareness about Georgia’s low-wage agricultural workers who are experiencing a coronavirus outbreak — news she said has been both suppressed and underreported.About 80% of the workers are Latino, and many are undocumented, she said. Their harsh living conditions make social distancing nearly impossible — as many as four to five share a room; communal bathrooms are used by up to 10 people.Undocumented workers have been labeled criminals, she said, referring to the president’s anti-immigration rhetoric. But their contributions have sustained the nation’s food supply during the pandemic. “You can’t pick Vidalia onions through Zoom,” Chicas said. “They are the ones who bring us fresh salads and vegetables.”Employment conditions are worse — workers lack adequate health care benefits and occupational protections, and forego lunch and water breaks during eight- to 12-hour daily shifts, “to try to make enough money to get by” while earning about $15,000 yearly, she said.Now, many have received “hypocritical” government letters saying they are essential workers, she said. “So, if they get stopped by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, they cannot be deported. Before COVID-19, we were in a rush to try to deport everyone out.”She urged webinar participants to consider how their vote in the upcoming November presidential election will impact the larger society, and to think, instead of through a lens of “how much progress we’ve made … through the lens of the most vulnerable.”‘As you lose your culture, you lose your health’Native Americans, particularly those living on tribal lands, have been hard-hit by COVID-19, according to Hauff, an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota Nation, headquartered in Pine Ridge, South Dakota.In Navajoland, for example, as of May 20, there were more than 4,253 reported cases and 146 deaths from the COVID-19 virus.Hauff said the lingering historical effects of “genocide, land theft and slavery,” as well as continued systematic oppression, have placed indigenous people at greater risk for contracting and dying from the coronavirus.“COVID-19 has the possibility of doing extensive damage to our indigenous community. It’s going to kill our elders, and our elders have been the guardians and keepers of our traditions and our spiritual lives and language. If we lose our elders, we will lose those things and that’s all we have left,” he said.Brokenleg agreed. “As you lose your culture, you lose your health — that is true for the American Indian. You lose community, a sense of belonging, it’s a downward spiral. They took away our way of life.”About 22% of the 5.2 million Native Americans live on tribal lands. The overall percentage living below the federal poverty line is 28.2%, more than twice the 12.3% national average. Many are without running water, electricity and telephone service, which they consider luxuries.Poverty, discrimination, substance abuse, and even dietary changes as Native Americans were forced onto reservations have contributed to increases in such chronic health conditions as diabetes, cancer, tuberculosis and heart disease, Brokenleg said. There is a lack of access to adequate health care —about 55% rely on the underfunded Indian Health Service, which meets about 60% of the need.Local governments have even attempted to thwart efforts to establish checkpoints to safeguard residents from the coronavirus, Brokenleg said.“When people sometimes ask us why we can’t just get over it, the answer is, until you heal from generational trauma, the same stuff will keep coming up,” she said.Often, Native Americans are rendered “invisible. People don’t realize we’re there. We get left out of health data, lumped into the ‘other’ category, which is not helpful to anyone.”Brokenleg referred participants to “Learn, Pray Act,” which includes resources for responding to racist violence, compiled by The Episcopal Church’s Department of Reconciliation, Justice and Creation Care and the Office of Government Relations.There are things everyone can do, she added. “Don’t be silent when things come up. Silence only hurts the people who are oppressed. It does not hurt the oppressor. Get out there, let people know you see them, that you support them.”Hauff referred congregations to the Native Land website, to learn about “The Acknowledgement,” a movement in the church to discover, honor and pray for the original indigenous owners of the land.“You can make it part of the prayers of the people, or put it on the church’s webpage or in bulletins or newsletters, essentially saying that the land on which their church is built was once the home of an indigenous person and it was taken away from them.”Acknowledging that history “doesn’t take much to do, but it can be so healing and transforming,” Hauff said.Wright, the Atlanta bishop, called white Americans to advocacy and action. “If you got white privilege, we need it to be channeled in constructive, positive ways to change systems.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls COVID-19, Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

Washington bishop signs onto Asian American Christian Collaborative statement condemning…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Emily McFarlan MillerPosted Mar 23, 2021 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Advocacy Peace & Justice Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN [Religion News Service] More than 600 Christians signed onto a statement before its release Monday evening (March 22) by the Asian American Christian Collaborative that condemns the shootings of eight people, including six women of Asian descent, last week at spas in the Atlanta area.“We call Christians and church leaders to make a clear and urgent response condemning this heinous act of hate, and we invite all Americans to work toward the dignity and respect of Asian and Asian American lives, especially women,” the statement reads.Among the signers of the AACC Statement on the Atlanta Massacre and Ongoing Anti-Asian Hate who helped draft the statement are the Rev. Raymond Chang and Michelle Ami Reyes, leaders of the AACC; Jenny Yang, vice president for advocacy and policy at World Relief; and Eugene Cho, CEO and president of Bread for the World.Other prominent signers include Walter Kim, president of the National Association of Evangelicals; Shirley Hoogstra, president of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities; the Rev. Soong-Chan Rah and Mark Charles, authors of “Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery”; Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington; Mimi Haddad, president and CEO of CBE (Christians for Biblical Equality) International; and the Rev. Brenda Salter McNeil, professor of reconciliation studies at Seattle Pacific University.“The Atlanta Massacre is the Asian American community’s George Floyd moment,” Reyes said in a written statement.“Now is the time to collectively stand for AAPI lives and dignity. If people stay silent, if people do nothing, we will see more of these sorts of horrific tragedies against Asians and Asian Americans in the future.”The statement situates the Atlanta shootings in what it refers to as “a long chain of hate and violence experienced by those of Asian descent in the United States.” That includes systemic anti-immigrant policies, the sexualization of Asian women in America and a surge in anti-Asian racism and violence tied to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the AACC.It also calls out American Christianity, noting the accused shooter — a 21-year-old white man — reportedly was a Christian and that “churches, denominations, and political ideologies/idolatries have normalized the dangerous ideologies that motivated him.”The statement calls on Christians and church leaders to take several actions. That includes confessing their failures in discipling congregants out of Christian nationalism;  preaching against anti-Asian racism, denouncing the Atlanta shootings and honoring the victims by using their names instead of centering the accused shooter; and educating congregations about Asian American issues, anti-Asian bias, the exotification of Asian women and Asian American histories of oppression and resistance.The statement also calls on Christian leaders to invite, empower and hire Asian American ministry leaders to speak into the ways their institutions can respond to anti-Asian racism and listen to their experiences. Outside of the church, the statement said, fighting anti-Asian racism looks like demanding federal agencies review how they define hate crimes, supporting legislation aimed at protecting victims and learning how the “model minority myth” pits Asian Americans against other people of color.Monday’s statement is the second statement released by the Asian American Christian Collaborative. The first, released almost exactly one year ago, launched the collaborative and denounced the anti-Asian racism its members had seen and experienced at the outset of the pandemic. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Washington bishop signs onto Asian American Christian Collaborative statement condemning Atlanta shootings Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

City Council to consider candidate for Community Development Director

first_img Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Tenita Reid Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom FROM THE CITY OF APOPKAThe Apopka City Council will consider Mark Reggentin as the city’s new community development director at a public meeting planned for 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall, 120 E. Main St.Reggentin started as a city planner in Lake Mary in 1989. He has served for 22 years as planning director in Mount Dora, overseeing projects very similar to Apopka.Mark ReggintinHis lengthy service in Mount Dora included an overhaul of the city’s comprehensive development plan and land development code. Apopka will undergo some of these needed improvements in the near future.Reggentin managed Envision Mount Dora – a long-range community planning project identical to Visioning Apopka that currently is creating a community consensus for future public improvements here. He oversaw Mount Dora’s two community redevelopment agencies – Apopka is focusing on its own community redevelopment area to encourage development of blighted properties downtown.Mount Dora has worked for many years to develop its quaint downtown as a popular destination for small businesses and visitors. Apopka residents have emphasized the need for this city to create a city center as a scenic, walkable destination to shop, host events and encourage economic development.Mount Dora worked with the Florida Department of Transportation and the Central Florida Expressway Authority for development of the Lake County portion of the Wekiva Parkway – a leg of the major highway project that will directly link Mount Dora to Apopka. Mount Dora also leveraged state and federal grants to offset costs of local community improvements similar to Apopka’s current efforts to expand public utility services.Reggentin also oversaw Mount Dora’s historic preservation of local buildings – another priority among residents in Apopka who want to preserve this area’s small-town feel amid a growing population of 45,000 residents spread across 33 square miles northwest of Orlando.The City of Apopka has selected a government planner with decades of local experience to help plan the future of Orange County’s second largest municipality.The appointment of the city’s new community development director comes at a critical time when Apopka is establishing a public vision for improvements over the next ten years. New businesses are moving into the area, expanding industrial, high-tech and medical jobs. The $1.6 billion Wekiva Parkway will further establish Apopka as a major transportation hub and a magnet for economic development.Each of these emphasize the need for strong community planning. Mark Reggentin knows all about that with 27 years of experience as a government planner in Central Florida. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 March 2, 2016 at 12:38 pm Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Tenita Reid Mallory walters March 1, 2016 at 5:06 pm Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Apopka City Hall 4 COMMENTS Reply March 2, 2016 at 4:36 pm TAGScity councilCity of Apopkacommunity development directorMark Reggentin Previous articleHershey Introduces Carrot Cake Kisses for EasterNext articleCandidate Forum will feature immigration and farmworker issues Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR March 1, 2016 at 4:07 pm I remember something in the news about this man, and how someone was sending anonymous letters to him in Mt. Dora, and to his home, and was threatening him ,and his family. Did they ever catch and arrest the culprit, that was trying to scare him away from applying for, and getting the city manager job that he wanted? That was bad, that someone would go to that extreme, to do that, to the man. It must have been someone on the inside that wanted the job themselves, or someone that wanted another person to get the job. Reply Does he REPLACE David Moon or are we adding more to the payroll? More frequent travel miles too. They are going to travel to see other cities, just got back from council meeting. Reply Phil Zakszewski According to the visioing study this will be a new position. So more money wii be spent. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more