More Americans Expect to Miss Mortgage Payments

first_img Previous: OCC Addresses Liquidity and Forbearance Issues Next: HUD, FHFA, CFPB Join Forces to Assist Homeowners Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago 2020-05-12 Seth Welborn More Americans Expect to Miss Mortgage Payments The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: Seth Welborn  Print This Post Share Save Home / Daily Dose / More Americans Expect to Miss Mortgage Payments May 12, 2020 1,552 Views The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Related Articles in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Center for Microeconomic Data released the April 2020 Survey of Consumer Expectations, which shows considerable deterioration in households’ expectations about most economic outcomes, including household debt. The perceived probability of losing one’s job reached a new series’ high for the second consecutive month.Median inflation expectations increased in April by 0.1 percentage point at the one-year horizon to 2.6% and by 0.2 percentage point at the three-year horizon to 2.6%. Respondents, however, increasingly disagree about the future path of inflation. The Fed’s measure of disagreement (the difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles of inflation expectations), increased for the second consecutive month at both horizons (from 5.1% and 4.4% in March to 6.0% and 4.7% in April for one-year and three-year ahead inflation, respectively). Disagreement about one-year ahead inflation reached a new series high in April.Median household income growth expectations dropped to 1.9% in April, reaching a new series low. The decrease was almost exclusively driven by respondents between the ages of 40 and 60. Additionally, 21.9% of respondents expect that their household income will decrease over the next year.The average perceived probability of missing a minimum debt payment over the next three months increased for the second consecutive month to 16.2% in April, well above its 12-month trailing average of 11.9%.Perceptions about households’ current financial situations compared to a year ago worsened for the second consecutive month, with 39.2% of respondents reporting to be worse off today than a year ago (versus 30.2% in March). Respondents are also increasingly pessimistic about their year-ahead financial situations with 31.6% of respondents expecting their households to be worse financially a year from now (versus 27.8% in March).Additionally, perceptions of credit access compared to a year ago deteriorated sharply in April, with 48.0% of respondents reporting access to credit being harder, as compared to 32.1% in March. Expectations for year-ahead credit availability also deteriorated in April, with 46.7% of respondents expecting that credit will become harder to access, as compared to 38.8% in March. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

Maryland county becomes first in the nation to ban hair discrimination

first_imgAaronAmat/iStock(ROCKVILLE) — Montgomery County, Maryland, has officially become the first in the United States to ban discrimination based on hairstyles on a local level.The county expanded its human rights legislation on Thursday to include the new ban after being unanimously voted to pass by the Montgomery County Council.This bill falls under the CROWN (Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair) Act, which ensures protection against discrimination based on hairstyles.The original bill was introduced in September 2019 and spearheaded by Montgomery County Council member Will Jawando along with Council President Nancy Navarro.“It will expand the definition of race to include natural hairstyles, like Afros, twists, Bantu knots and protective hairstyles like braids, that people of African descent wear,” Jawando said in an interview with ABC Washington D.C. station WTOP. “We have over 200,000 black and Latina women in Montgomery County, many of whom get up every day and make decisions about how they are going to present themselves to the world,” Jawando said.Montgomery’s news follows similar legislations passed on a state level in California, New York and New Jersey.Sen. Cory Booker also announced efforts in December 2019 to pass the first federal bill banning hair discrimination.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Thank you to Good Samaritans

first_imgDONNA CROTTY To the Editor:I want to thank the Good Samaritans who helped me when I most needed help. Thank you to the people on East 27th Street, in the CVS parking lot, and on the corner of 33rd Street and Broadway who helped me when I fell, on three separate occasions this past year, and saw to it that I got appropriate medical attention. With the exception of Dr. Michael Acanfora and his receptionist, I don’t know your names and can’t say that I even would recognize your faces if I saw you again. However, please know that all of you have my deepest appreciation and gratitude. You could have passed by on the other side but chose to help a fellow human in need. God bless and keep each and every one of you, always.last_img