10 months ago​Caen, Fenerbahce eyeing Leicester winger Diabate

first_img​Caen, Fenerbahce eyeing Leicester winger Diabateby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City youngster Fousseni Diabaté is being linked with a move away from the club.The 23-year-old arrived in January, but he has been unable to impress in the 12 months since joining from Ajaccio.He has only played in one Premier League game this season.And Le 10 Sport suggests that a loan move to Caen in France is a possibility.Turkish side Fenerbahce also have an interest, but they would prefer a permanent transfer. TagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Chetwood Primary Retains Credit Union Quiz Championship

first_imgThe St. James-based Chetwood Memorial Primary School has emerged victorious in the Montego Co-operative Credit Union (MCCU) Schools’ Academic Championship Quiz, retaining the trophy, which the institution first won in 2012.Chetwood edged another St. James team, Green Pond Primary School, in the closely contested finals held on Wednesday, June 26, at the Montego Bay Civic Centre. Bethel Primary and Junior High School in Hanover was third.More than 16 primary and junior high, all age and preparatory schools from the western region participated in the annual competition, which tests the students’ knowledge and skills in various subject areas. The objectives are to sharpen the students’ academic and intellectual responses, build camaraderie, and promote good conduct and a spirit of fair play.The top schools and their coaches walked away with MCCU Championship Trophies, MCCU Medallions, savings certificates, watches, cellular phones, computers and printers, gift packages, meal vouchers, televisions, and complimentary stay at various resorts.An elated team captain, Mark Brown, credited the school’s victory to hard work and dedication to their studies.Teacher at the school, Yvonne Froyze, expressed the hope that the school’s second hold on the trophy will motivate the student population to always strive for the best and will also serve to increase literacy levels.Co-ordinator of the competition, Lorna Clarke, told JIS News that a key objective of the quiz, now in its 21st year, is to encourage saving at a young age, as the students are given incentives to open bank accounts.She commended the various sponsors of the competition for contributing to the academic growth of the country’s students.“Each year, we go back to the same business community, and they are always willing and ready to assist us. We couldn’t have done this without them,” Ms. Clarke said.President of the Senate, Hon. Floyd Morris, who delivered the main address, encouraged the students to take their education seriously.“Education is the critical means for social transformation, and empowerment in any society. It is that ingredient that empowers any individual, and makes them able to deal with the various offerings of the society,” he stated.Contact: Garfield L. Anguslast_img read more

3 killed in Quebec helicopter crash

first_imgA four-seater helicopter was travelling from Quebec’s Beauce region to the Lanaudiere when it crashed in a snow-covered field near Drummondville, Que., killing all three people aboard, police said Friday.Quebec provincial police said the crash occurred at about 9 p.m. just north of the city about 110 kilometres northeast of Montreal.The victims – two women and one man – have not yet been identified.The Transportation Safety Board of Canada said the helicopter was a Robinson R44 model and owned by a private company.Police said the helicopter caught fire after a violent impact along the banks of the Saint-Francois River, in the city’s Saint-Joachim-de-Courval district.First responders had a difficult time getting to the scene because of deep snow. A snow removal machine was brought in from the city of Drummondville to help them get to the site.Marc Descoteaux, who owns a farm not far from where the helicopter crashed, said he smelled smoke as he did some work on Thursday evening.“It was burning smell, not a wood burning smell but more like metal or sodder,” Descoteaux said in a phone interview. “Before going home, I saw a fire in the middle of a field about 800 meters from my house.”Thinking it was a snowmobile on fire, he called his nephew to go have a look. The field is considered part of the farm land, but it is devoid of any buildings.His nephew accessed the area by snowmobile. Realizing it was a helicopter, Descoteaux said they called police.“A helicopter at night in the neighbourhood is very rare,” he said of his rural area. “We get very few cars at night, let alone helicopters.”His brother used a snowblower to make a path for the first officers and emergency personnel at the scene.Provincial police spokesman Hugo Fournier said an investigation is underway to determine the cause of the crash, including weather conditions last night.Transportation Safety Board investigators have begun their investigation as well.One of those investigators, Pierre Gavillet, said it was too soon to know whether the crash occurred at high speed.“At first glance we try to see the marks in the snow,” he told reporters at the scene. “We try to establish the flight trajectory before the impact.”Gavillet said the investigators would gather information on the weather, the pilot’s qualifications and the body of the chopper, which he said was heavily damaged.He said it wasn’t clear whether the helicopter would need to be sent to the TSB’s lab for further analysis.last_img read more

The Long Migration Of English Football

Teams from the South of England are currently dominating the Premier League.London-based Chelsea is in first place, and is a prohibitive favorite to win the title. Southampton — the southernmost team in the league — currently sits second. Both teams won their games last weekend, beating teams from the North and Midlands. West Ham, also based in London, is in fourth.While the North (working class, the Beatles) dominated the league for decades, the South (London, the Rolling Stones) has slowly been gaining ground. This process has been driven by culture, politics and the economy.Using the mammoth football data set compiled by one of this article’s authors (James),1We’ve previously explored scoring trends and home-field advantage. we can quantify, and map, the migration of power in the world’s top soccer league over the past 126 years.England has always had strong regional identities and overt class distinctions. The biggest of these is between North and South. The most obvious differences between these regions are in dialect, culture, politics and economy, but there also exists a North-South football divide. Indeed, the story of the origins of English football is about tensions between working-class Northerners and upper-class Southerners.Here is the geography of English top-tier football league champions:Dots show the location of teams that have won the league championship, with the size representing the number of titles. The line is a 20-year moving average of the latitudes and longitudes of winners of the top tier — the center of gravity.2Before World War I, thanks to successes of teams from the North, the center hovered around the Lancashire-Yorkshire border. After 1930, Southern teams enjoyed more title success and the center began a march southeast through the Peak District, reaching as far as the town of Rugby (that sport’s eponym) following Chelsea’s first win in 1955. With the emergence of powerful Manchester United and later the Liverpool dynasty, the center moved back toward Lancashire. Recently, due to Arsenal’s and Chelsea’s titles, the center has once more moved southeast, and currently resides just outside Burton-upon-Trent (a small town which notably has had four Football League teams in its history). Our colleagues performed a similar calculation with winners of the National Hockey League’s Stanley Cup. That center of gravity is somewhere in Lake Huron.The rules of modern soccer were developed in England in 1863 when the representatives of 11 London clubs and elite private schools (in the South) convened at the Freemasons’ Tavern to establish what would become the Football Association, the game’s governing body. The rules were further modified in 1869 — when handballs were outlawed — leading to more or less the game we know today.Amateur teams, composed of upper class gentlemen from the South of England, enjoyed early success in the first major national competition — the FA Cup — which began in 1871. However, teams from the North and Midlands quickly sprang up out of religious community organizations, schools and trade unions. Football, an accessible, democratic game, caught fire in the North.By the mid-1880s, talented players from these areas and Scotland started to be paid for their services in the increasingly competitive North. This led to several years of bitter arguments between the Northern clubs and the powerful, and Southern-founded, Football Association. Central to this dispute were the original men in blazers — two of the earliest presidents of the FA, Colonel Sir Francis Marindin and Lord Kinnaird, established members of the Southern upper crust, and avowed amateur footballers.3The phrase “men in blazers” has often been used in England to derisively refer to ineffectual and out-of-touch committee members of the FA.Professional working-class Northern teams rapidly overtook their gentlemen Southerner counterparts in ability. The amateurs’ death knell tolled in 1883 when the professional Blackburn Olympic side — featuring weavers, plumbers, dental assistants and iron-foundry workers — beat the epitome of English privilege, the amateur Old Etonians, for the FA Cup title.4Eton College is the most elite private school in England. It is also the traditional alma mater of male members of the Royal Family, including Prince William and Prince Harry. Old Etonians is the collective name for former pupils.Wanting to capitalize on the huge popularity of football among working-class fans, Northern teams formed their own professional league, demanding that the FA accept their will. In 1888, the Football League was founded — six teams from the North and six from the Midlands. It was an immediate success. More teams from the North and Midlands were added and a second division was established in 1892.The early decades of the Football League were dominated by these Northern and Midland teams. Notably, Aston Villa and Sunderland won six and five titles, respectively, before World War I. It wasn’t until 1931 that a Southern team (Arsenal) was crowned league champion. Indeed, until Arsenal’s FA Cup win in 1930, Northern and Midland teams had also won every single FA Cup since 1883, except for London’s Tottenham Hotspur in 1901. Even that team started five Scots, three Northerners, two Welshman and an Irishman.The following chart shows the cumulative top-flight league titles won by individual teams, colored by the team’s region.The Football League became truly national at the start of the 1920-21 season when a third division, composed entirely of teams from the South of England, was created. Over the following decades more Southern teams — Portsmouth, Charlton Athletic, Fulham — gradually rose through successive promotions to find a place in the top tier.While the league creeped south, it retained its strong Northern flavor. The continued domination of the North is best seen by examining the number of championships piled up by teams from this region between 1920 and 1980. Only Arsenal from the South provided anything like competition for Northern teams such as Everton, Liverpool and Manchester United, all of which won multiple titles.The fabric of English society changed dramatically during the 1980s. The force that was Margaret Thatcher and her Conservative government’s right-wing policies led to a boom in the prosperity of the City of London and the South in general, while left-wing trade union power waned.Unemployment in the United Kingdom rose from 5.7 percent in 1979, the year Thatcher took office, to 13 percent in 1983. This aggravated the economic inequality between North and South, and many Northern cities and people suffered financially. These wider economic and political changes were mirrored by shifts in the representation of Northern and Southern soccer teams in England’s top division.Here are the average latitudes of all teams in the top division of English football, by season:Only seven times in history has the average latitude of England’s top-flight soccer teams dipped beneath Birmingham — often called England’s “second city” and considered to be a marker of the middle of the country. The first was in 1982, three years after Thatcher became prime minister. The last was in 1991, one year after Thatcher left Downing Street.Smaller Southern teams — Watford, Wimbledon, Millwall and Oxford United (bankrolled by the business tycoon Robert Maxwell) — made the top tier for the first time during this decade, while others such as Charlton Athletic and Luton Town returned after long absences. The most Southern-skewed season was 1987-88. Although the top four teams all came from the North and Midlands — Manchester United, Liverpool, Nottingham Forest and Everton — 13 of the remaining 17 sides were Southern.Meanwhile, many former great Northern and Midland teams suffered. Bolton Wanderers, Burnley, Preston North End and Wolverhampton Wanderers, all founding members of the Football League, were relegated to the fourth tier during the 1980s.The nature of English soccer changed forever with the formation of the Premier League in 1992, the huge influx of money and the globalization of the game.In the early years of the EPL, there was a brief mini-revival for several historically strong Northern teams, like Middlesbrough, Leicester City, Bolton, Sunderland and Nottingham Forest, that had suffered during the 1980s. Each was promoted back to the top tier during the mid-1990s. Most notably, Blackburn Rovers, bankrolled by local businessman Jack Walker, won the Premier League in 1995.But these teams have all since struggled to consistently retain their places in the EPL, as survival and success are determined more and more by financial muscle. Footprints of the old historical North-South divide are still evident in the composition of teams in England’s top tier but, in order to compete, EPL teams have increasingly become global franchises, taken over by uber-wealthy foreign owners, many of whom have preferred to invest in teams near London, the nation’s capital.English football in the 19th and 20th centuries was fueled by the fanaticism of working-class fans, going to watch their local heroes play for their hometown team. The connection between fans and their clubs was built upon these regional and local ties. In the 21st century, the super-successful, globalized EPL has seen the diminishment of some of these strong regional identities that had mattered so much. read more

Derrick Rose Out for Remainder of Season with New

The Chicago Bulls have announced that point guard Derrick Rose is out for the remainder of the season after undergoing knee surgery to repair his MCL Monday.Dr. Brian Cole operated on Rose’s medial meniscus in his right knee at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Cole is the same doctor who performed the ACL surgery on Rose’s left knee in May 2012.Rose’s team has expressed disappointment from within the Bulls’ locker room since his new injury Friday night against the Portland Trail Blazers, but Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau and the rest of the team are trying the be positive.“I texted him,” Thibodeau said of his communication with Rose. “The surgery was a success. So he obviously has to focus in on the rehab. And our team, we have to lock into our improvement and getting wins. The big thing for him is he just has to focus in on his rehab. The fact that he’s already done it once, he has great mental toughness, he’ll be fine. This will be another bump in the road, he’ll get past it. We expect him to make a full recovery.”Thibodeau is confident that his squad will be fine without Rose since they did good without him last season when he suffered from his ACL injury.“It’s the nature of the NBA,” Thibodeau said. “It’s constant change, there’s always things being thrown at you and it’s how quickly you can adapt to those changes. So that’s the challenge that we’re faced with right now. The games are coming, we have to be ready, we have to come out with the right mindset and we have to go after people.” read more

Adrian Peterson Finally Reinstated to NFL But He Does

Now that Adrian Peterson is back in the NFL fold—finally—the questions are: What took so long and where will he play next season?The game’s most explosive running back had been suspended since November 4 because of a misdemeanor reckless injury charge resulting from an incident where he created bruises on the body of his young son.The reinstatement goes into effect on Friday, which means it took five months to get Peterson’s case finally resolved. Which is a long time. Consider that Ray Rice’s case—caught on tape when he knocked out his then-fiancee in an Atlantic City hotel elevator—was resolved fast enough for him to be reinstated and signed by an NFL team, although no club picked him up.Peterson had to be relieved when commissioner Roger Goodell sent the Minnesota Viking a letter advising him of his reinstatement, ending the controversy and finally allowing him to resume his luminous career.Goodell reminded Peterson in the letter that will have to fulfill all the obligations of his plea deal with authorities, including participating in counseling, and that any other violations of the personal conduct policy by Peterson would result in additional discipline, including possible suspension without pay or banishment from the NFL.Peterson met with Goodell earlier this month regarding his reinstatement, the first time they had spoken since the child abuse case arose last September. Peterson told ESPN on Feb. 19 that he had been following the NFL’s requirements for reinstatement, adding he had met with Dr. April Kuchuk—the New York University psychiatry instructor Goodell had assigned to Peterson’s case—to set up a counseling and treatment plan.The Vikings acknowledged they received word from Goodell’s office that Peterson was reinstated and “We look forward to Adrian re-joining the Vikings” the team said in a statement.It does not appear Peterson wants any parts of the Vikings, however. The team starts offseason workouts on Monday and hold their first mandatory minicamp in June. No one can say for sure if Peterson will show up for any of the team’s offseason program.He told ESPN in February he believed the team had not shown sufficient support for him in the wake of his indictment in September and called the decision to put him on the exempt list an “ambush.”Peterson’s agent, Ben Dogra, Peterson wants out and has visited with teams, including the Dallas Cowboys, according to reports. The Vikings have said repeatedly they want Peterson back and have no plan to trade him. Peterson’s contract calls for a $12.75 million salary this season and doesn’t expire for another three years.It’s understandable that the Vikings would want to keep Peterson. He’s the best in the business. But when he needed support, the team abandoned him, taking advice from some “Olivia Pope” type to distance themselves from the beleaguered star. So now that the case is over, that Peterson has endured and is eligible to play, the team wants its prized commodity.Peterson said he is not falling for the okey-doke. He’d like a trade, but certainly cannot force one. Saying he wants out should be enough for Minnesota to unload him for something of value to truly put this saga behind, as with Peterson around, it will be a distraction all season.But if the Vikings truly are intent on keeping Peterson, they have to make him feel their commitment to him, kiss his proverbial ring, so to speak.Peterson deserved the drama he had to endure. Now he deserves a team that will apologize for abandoning him and give him the support any player needs. Whether that’s the Vikings or not is in question. read more

Mens lacrosse opens season with pair of home matchups

With a powerful group of veteran leaders and a super sophomore class, the Ohio State men’s lacrosse team looks to start its season with a victory tonight against Detroit (0-1). OSU coach Nick Myers said the Buckeyes’ leadership comes from a group of 14 seniors — four of whom are captains — and junior captain Brock Sorensen. “You have got to look to those seniors for leadership first and foremost,” he said. “They have really stepped out and taken charge of this team and made it clear that it’s an effort every day that we pay attention to detail.” Two of the Buckeye captains, midfielders Scott Lathrop and Jarred Bowman, agreed. “There is going to be adversity throughout the year,” Bowman said. “As long as we stay together and really focus on having each other’s backs and being there for everybody, we will be fine.” Although the leadership comes from the senior class, a large part of the scoring for OSU comes from a duo of sophomores. At attack, Logan Schuss and Jeff Tundo return to the Buckeyes after being the top two scorers for the team during their freshman seasons. Schuss finished the 2010 campaign with a team-high 56 points with 31 goals for the Buckeyes, and Tundo added 35 points with 20 goals. Although those two attackers are only sophomores, Myers said he holds them to the same standards as he does the team’s veterans. “A lot of those sophomores that play for us, we’re treating those guys like veterans,” Myers said. “We want them to play like veterans as second-year guys, and that’s a big strength for us.” A challenge for the Buckeyes this season will be the difficulty of their non-conference schedule, which includes No. 1 Virginia, No. 2 North Carolina and No. 10 Notre Dame. “We probably have the toughest non-conference schedule we’ve ever faced,” Myers said. “We understand it’s going to be one game at a time.” On Saturday, OSU had two scrimmages — one against defending National Champion No. 5 Duke and another against Division III power Salisbury. But the Buckeyes are anxious to get on the field for a regular season game. “We have been practicing against each other for a month now as well as all of fall,” Lathrop said. “We got some scrimmage time last week but it’s not the same as a regular game. I think everyone is just real excited to play another team in a real-game situation.” Last year, the Buckeyes went 7-8 and finished No. 33. Their last meeting with Detroit was Feb. 27, 2010. Behind a team-high six points from Schuss, OSU came away with a 16-7 victory. The Titans fell to No. 17 Delaware, 13-5, in their season opener Saturday. OSU kicks off its regular season at 7 p.m. tonight at Woody Hayes Athletic Center. read more

Baseball Ohio State ends threegame skid shuts out Ohio University 30

Ohio State redshirt junior pitcher Yianni Pavlopoulos throws a pitch against Delaware on Feb. 18 in Osceola, Florida, during the Sunshine State Classic. Credit: Courtesy of OSU AthleticsComing off a three-game sweep at the hands of the Minnesota Golden Gophers, the Ohio State baseball team needed to build some momentum before their next Big Ten series against the Purdue Boilermakers.And though OSU’s offense did not muster many runs, the pitching staff of the Buckeyes was able to hold Ohio University to no runs on six hits in the team’s 3-0 victory. It was the first time OSU shutout their opponent this season.For OSU coach Greg Beals, the most important part about Tuesday’s game was just getting the win ahead of a crucial Big Ten matchup.“The biggest story for me in the day is that we got a victory, a much needed victory and a victory in which we pitched the ball very well and used multiple guys to do it,” Beals said. “It was one of those games where we wanted to get guys work, but we thought we needed to win also. We needed to get on winning ways. We needed to change the air and the only way to do that is to have some success and win a ballgame.”It took a while, but the scoreboard was finally lit up in the bottom of the fourth inning. With one away in the inning, sophomore catcher Jacob Barnwell attempted a stolen base of third and was successful. The throw by the catcher was errant, deflecting off the third baseman’s glove into foul territory and allowing Barnwell to run home and score the Buckeyes’ first run of the game. That one run was all the Buckeyes would need for redshirt junior starting pitcher Austin Woodby, who was lights out in his controlled midweek start. He was limited to only 45 pitches by the coaching staff, but was able to make the most of those pitches. Woodby gave his team 4.2 shutout innings and allowed just three hits and no walks with one strikeout.“Tonight was definitely a night where I felt confident in my fastball,” Woodby said. “I’ve been working on really just commanding the fastball in the bottom of the zone and just letting the defense work for me. I’ve got a great defense behind me and I felt very confident.”One thing that really stood out to Woodby was his ability to limit the opposition to zero walks.“Coach Stafford preaches no free bases. If you limit those walks then I think we’ll be in a good position to win,” Woodby said. “For me, this has been definitely a nice change as opposed to last year. I feel a lot more confident with the zone and throwing strikes and I think we’re headed in the right direction.”The Buckeyes got things going again three innings later. With the bases loaded and one out in the bottom of the seventh inning, Barnwell stepped up the plate and lined a base hit up the middle, scoring a pair. That at-bat was crucial for OSU in giving them some added insurance runs headed into the latter innings of the game, and Beals felt that was a strong at-bat from his young backstop.“Really just a quality at-bat,” Beals said. “The one thing I like about Barnie is I know where he’s going to compete . . . He’s a catcher first, he’s a catch-and-throw guy first, that’s what his bread and butter is, but he’s also given us a lot, just from a competitive standpoint in the batter’s box.”With the Buckeyes leading 3-0, Beals turned to redshirt junior reliever Yianni Pavlopoulos to try and keep the Bobcats off the scoreboard.Pavlopoulos surrendered singles to each of the first two batters he faced, the first hit being a line drive and the second being a bloop single.But after the first two reached base, Pavlopoulos was able to strike out the next two and coerce a lineout from the final batter of the inning and strand the runners on first and second base.Beals said Pavlopoulos has been going through a stretch with some pretty poor luck, but he was proud of the way his former closer fought back after the two hits and retired the side.“Poor Yianni, (if) he’s got any luck, it’s not really good luck right now,” Beals said. “He beats a guy with the fastball in and he lobs it into left field and very easily could have been an easy ground ball, and probably should have been. But he battled and made a couple big pitches to get some strikeouts and get out of that inning so good for him.”The key to getting the pitcher back on track will be to take them through step-by-step of what’s working and what isn’t, Beals said, and the same goes for Pavlopoulos’ struggles this season.“I think the thing that’s going to be critical for us as a coaching staff is to pull Yianni aside and have him look at his process. Look at where he was, the quality of his pitches,” Beals said. “The first hit was a hung breaking ball. Not a quality pitch. When he made quality pitches, he had good results other than the bleeder. But in our opinion, the way we look at it, that’s a win. He beat the bat and it just happens that way sometimes.”And for the first time in a long time, the bullpen was able to get back to 2016 form. As a unit, the bullpen allowed just three hits and one walk across five scoreless innings that included five strikeouts.Coming off his spotless start, Woodby feels confidence by the way the team’s bullpen pitched and he feels they are ready heading into the big weekend.“I’m feeling good about our bullpen,” Woodby said. “I think everyone threw well tonight so it just kind of gives us some confidence rolling into this weekend because it’s definitely three important games for us.”OSU hopes to build off this victory when they host Purdue University in its second Big Ten series of the season over the weekend. That matchup starts on Friday with first pitch scheduled for 6:35 p.m. read more