‘Chronicles of Narnia’-themed, Lenten lecture series to begin

first_imgFor many Catholics and Christians, the final day before Lent is a time to eat as much food as possible in preparation for the fasting of Ash Wednesday. For the McGrath Institute for Church Life, however, it is the time to kick off a new lecture series, “‘Chronicles of Narnia’: A Spiritual Journey from Lent to Easter.”The first two lectures will be delivered Tuesday from 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. in the Eck Visitors Center Auditorium. A one-credit course is being taught concurrently in order to offer students a chance to read C.S. Lewis’ “Chronicles of Narnia” and engage in deeper conversations about the themes of the novels. Although the course is not open to the general public, everyone is permitted to attend the lectures and join the spiritual journey.Theology professor Leonard DeLorenzo — who is teaching the corresponding course — said the lecture series will provide an opportunity for people to connect and reflect.“Our idea here was to allow people to get together and take something of a literary pilgrimage during the liturgical season [of Lent],” he said. “People are invited to read along, and we bring in speakers who can draw out the theological themes [and offer] some spiritual reflection on the works that we are reading.”Theology professor David Fagerberg will be delivering the first lecture in the series, which will offer an overview of the “Chronicles,” and how Lewis came to write them. Following Fagerberg’s talk, DeLorenzo will present the second lecture focusing on the “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” the first novel in the series.DeLorenzo said he wants his lecture to convey the importance of being truly engaged in the story.“I have read the ‘Chronicles of Narnia’ many times … but it was in the experience of reading these stories to my 5-year-old that I came to a deeper appreciation of the real treasure here, which is to be actually engaged in the story,” he said.He explained the goal of reading the texts should not be analysis, but rather immersion.“[You should] allow yourself to be drawn in and surprised. Children do that most naturally. … They don’t ask about the author’s intention [like] we adults do,” DeLorenzo said. “For us adults, there’s something really refreshing [about] allowing ourselves to be led by children into a story like this. [My lecture] is about engaging this particular story, ‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,’ in that [childlike] way.”Fagerberg echoed the importance of reading a story that was intended for children as an adult.“I was pulling material together, and Lewis says in one place that, ‘[The ‘Chronicles’] would be a bad story if it was only read by children, and a bad story if it was not read more than once,’ so I think that we are trying to bring people back to reading the ‘Chronicles’ again,” he said.Fagerberg said the importance of reading these stories during the Lenten season — as the Christlike qualities of the story’s hero, Aslan — can offer a deeper reflection on one’s image of God.“There is an exchange between Aslan and Lucy in the second chronicle … and he says, ‘Each year you grow older, you will find me bigger,’” he said. “Aslan is Christ, and as you grow older, you find Christ bigger. Most of us are stuck with a very small and childish picture of God … and that’s what [we] want to talk about … and give an opportunity to do: to encounter face-to-face the mystery of Aslan.”Recorded versions of the lectures will be available online. A full schedule of the lecture series is also available on the McGrath Institute’s website.Tags: Lent, McGrath Institute for Church Life, spirituality, The Chronicles of Narnialast_img read more

Over 1200 projects turned in for Virtual Fair

first_imgBrookville, IN— A total of  919 entries have been uploaded in Fair Entry for the Franklin County Virtual fair for the non-walking projects.  This also includes record sheets and worksheets for completion. The numbers for the virtual livestock shows have been counted and sorted with each member being allowed to exhibit 2 animals per class per species:Beef: 44 entriesDairy: 12 entriesDairy Goats: 34 entriesMeat Goats: 58 entriesPoultry: 36 entriesRabbits: 29 entriesSheep: 22 entriesSwine: 88 entrieslast_img

Scientific Games completes $ & € debt financing round

first_img StumbleUpon Kambi and DraftKings agree on final closure terms July 24, 2020 Submit Share Share Scientific Games records $198m loss as COVID swamps casino and lottery performance July 24, 2020 Related Articles Esports Entertainment bolsters tournament capacity by acquiring EGL August 27, 2020 Updating the market, Nasdaq-listed gambling technology group Scientific Games Corporation (SGC), has confirmed the successful conclusion of its + $1 billion debt notes sale to private investors.The Nasdaq corporation first announced its $ and € debt sale on 30 January, seeking to restructure its long-term corporate financing.Completing the debt transactions, SGC governance secures the following financing structure:Tranche 1: A private offering of $900 million additional aggregate principal amount of its 5% senior secured notes due 2025 at an issue price of 100%.Tranche 2: A private offering of €325 million, of new 3.375% senior secured notes due 2026 (the “Euro Secured Notes”) at an issue price of 100.%.Tranche 3: A private offering of €250 million, of new 5.5% senior ‘unsecured notes’ due 2026 at an issue price of 100%.The financing will allow SGC governance to redeem its 7% – $2.1 billion corporate debt notes, due for payment in 2022.SGC governance details that its new debt financing structure will save the corporation approximately $69 million in yearly ‘cash interest costs’, with the Nasdaq able to ‘extend maturities’ to 2025 and 2026.Issuing a January corporate update, SGC informed investors that the gambling group would deliver full-year 2017 corporate net loss in the range of approximately $238-to-$248 million, improving on FY 2016 net loss of $354 million.last_img read more