Ducks unable to get sweep

first_imgST. PAUL, Minn. – A desperate move by a desperate coach breathed some life into the Minnesota Wild. Jacques Lemaire’s decision to put his top three scorers – Brian Rolston, Marian Gaborik and Pavol Demitra – on one line generated the kind of offense the Ducks had stifled in the first three games of this series. Marian Gaborik scored a rare power-play goal and Niklas Backstrom made 28 saves to help the Wild avoid a sweep with a 4-1 victory over the Ducks in Game 4 on Tuesday night. “All the guys we were waiting for, they all scored tonight,” Lemaire said. Rolston, Pierre-Marc Bouchard and Mark Parrish also scored for the Wild, who had been thoroughly dominated by Chris Pronger, Scott Niedermayer and the defensive Ducks in the first three games of the series. Minnesota still faces an incredibly daunting task. Only two teams in NHL history have come back from 3-0 deficits to advance in the playoffs, the 1975 New York Islanders and the 1942 Toronto Maple Leafs. Game 5 is Thursday in Anaheim. For at least one more game, the Wild can hope. Trailing 1-0 after Pronger’s power-play goal just over six minutes into the second period, the game changed about 10 minutes later when Lemaire went with the Big Line, assembling a potent unit that accounted for 86 of the team’s 225 goals during the season. That’s more than 38 percent of the Wild’s total, a mark made more impressive by the 49 games missed between them. But through the first three playoff games, Gaborik, Demitra and Rolston had a grand total of two goals and one assist, and Bouchard, a 20-goal scorer, didn’t even have a shot on goal. The Wild’s strategy Tuesday night was simple: Shoot, shoot, and shoot some more. After getting only 20 shots on goal in Game 3, the Wild had 40 on Tuesday night. “They played desperate,” Ducks coach Randy Carlyle said. Bouchard tied it with less than two minutes remaining in the second, and Gaborik’s power-play goal in the third highlighted a three-goal period for Minnesota. Six minutes later, the Big Line was on the move again, when Rolston grabbed a loose puck at along the boards to start a three-on-two. Demitra fed the puck back to him, and Ilya Bryzgalov didn’t stand a chance to get over to make the save. “Jacques changes lines around, and I think it was a great move,” Gaborik said. “It worked well for us. We had a couple of goals there, and we had great chances.” That kind of room in front of Bryzgalov just wasn’t there in the first three games of the series, when the Ducks suffocated Minnesota’s high flyers and forced them to play dump and chase with little effect. “Those are guys that obviously they look at to supply a lot of their offense and when they’re all on one line, we’ve got to shut them down,” Pronger said.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Proverbs 3:27 at work as Ohio agricultural relief efforts head to Nebraska

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseDo not withhold good from those to whom it is due, when it is in your power to act. That is the very clear message from Proverbs 3:27.It can’t be certain this verse is top of mind for the many in Ohio’s agricultural community who are dropping what they are doing to donate, travel, work, and serve their fellow farmers across the country, but they certainly are demonstrating it.Terrible flooding in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri has left farms swamped and devastated generations of work on the land in recent weeks. One Ohio group of six tractor-trailers and 11 trucks and trailers filled with food, clothes, hay, feed, and hygiene products donated from farmers, businesses and church leaders from the Norwalk, Monroeville, Ashland, and Mansfield areas left earlier this week for Verdigre, Neb. An additional group from Ohio plans to leave next week. Another group leaves March 29 in an effort being organized by Greg and Rose Hartschuh in Crawford County through Ohio’s Rural America Relief.“Last week we were watching these videos from Nebraska and the bomb cyclone with snow and blizzard-like conditions and rain and ice chunks with flooding and saw a lot of people hurting out there,” Rose said. “A lot of places just looked like an ocean. It is on a day-by-day basis. Every day they are opening up more roads. I read a story about a farmer out there. It usually takes him 20 minutes to get to his cattle but now he is going 200 miles round trip just to take care of his cattle.”The Hartschuhs decided it was in their power to act, and this is not the first time.“In 2017 wildfires ravaged Kansas and Oklahoma and that part of the country and my husband and I wanted to do what we could to help. It kind of snowballed from there and we ended up organizing quite a bit of hay and a good group of volunteers to head out,” Rose said. “We started kicking around the idea again. Should we do something? It took a little longer to decide this time because it did end up being a pretty big effort last time. We learned a lot from Kansas. From the beginning we said we are going to help but we are going to do it in a different way. One of the differences is that hay is harder to come by in Ohio this time. We also know that fuel costs for hay are expensive to haul it across the country.”The Hartschuh group will include 10 trucks and trailers filled with supplies and 30 volunteers going to help lend a hand.“Fencing is a huge need, as well as just people to help. They are talking about corn stalks a couple of feet deep in some areas. All of that is going to have to move before they can even think about planting,” Rose said. “We set up several different drop-off locations around the state for supplies and of course you can always give cash. Nebraska Farm Bureau has a relief fund set up and that money goes directly to the farmers impacted. Our group is also taking cash and we’ll use that to help defray our travel costs. We are estimating our costs will be around $5,000. If there is anything left we will give it to the Nebraska Farm Bureau fund.”Included in the group are six senior FFA students from Wynford.“They are really going to have a unique experience,” Rose said. “This is the kind of trip that can really change your perspective on a lot of things.”The group is meeting in Tiffin early March 29 and headed west on I-80/90 to Schuyler, Neb. On Saturday, the supplies will be delivered to the North Bend, Neb. area. Volunteers will help with cleanup over the weekend and return to Ohio on Monday.Those interested in donating to the effort can go to PayPal to [email protected] or use the link: https://PayPal.me/RuralAmericaRelief. Checks can be made to Ohio’s Rural America Relief and mailed to 6348 Parks Road, Sycamore, OH 44882. Any funds that are left after the trip will be donated directly to Nebraska Farm Bureau. Follow along this weekend on the Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net Facebook page.Hats off to those willing to act when they have the power to do so and carry out the spirit of Proverbs 3:27.last_img read more

High-Tech Windows with Dynamic Glazings

first_imgThe problem is that when you choose a particular glazing for windows, you’re locked into very specific window performance properties. Tinted glass, for example, not only blocks solar heat gain, but also reduces visible light transmittance–making it harder to see through the windows. Blocking that solar gain may be fine most of the time, but even in warm climates there can be times, in the winter for example, when you’d like to bring in that extra solar heat.This lack of flexibility with the usual materials has led some companies to pursue technologies that would allow glazing properties to change, based either on user preferences or on conditions such as temperature. These are collectively referred to as “dynamic glazings.”There were a number of dynamic glazings being exhibited at Greenbuild. I was already familiar with SageGlass, from Sage Electrochromics. This is an “electrochromic” glazing that is normally clear, but it can be tinted by charging it with a small amount of electric current. When SageGlass is used in an insulated glass unit (with standard clear glass), a user can flip a switch, to tint the glass, dropping the solar transmittance from 62% down to 3.5%. It takes a small amount of electricity, about 0.3 watts per square foot, to switch it from clear to tinted (a process that takes 5-10 minutes), then somewhat less current, 0.1 watts per square foot, to maintain the tinted state. When the current flow is switched off, the glazing reverts to it default (clear) state.SageGlass is available as an (expensive) option with Velux skylights and about a dozen commercial glazing systems. The high cost of SageGlass can be offset to some extent, particularly in commercial applications, by eliminating the need for widow blinds, but it’s still very expensive—$50-75 per square foot.The new dynamic glazing product I saw at Greenbuild was from the start-up company RavenBrick. This is a passive, “thermochromic” glazing that changes from clear to tinted when it heats up, such as in bright sunlight. While SageGlass is a metallic coating on the glass, like common low-e coatings, RavenBrick uses an organic material sandwiched between two layers of glass. The actual thermochromic material is only eight microns thick.Clear in its normal state, when the RavenBrick coating is heated up it darkens to allow only 8% light transmission. The idea is that during a hot sunny day, the glass will heat up and activate the thermochromic material, blocking most of the sunlight, while on a cooler or cloudy day, the glass will remain clear. A big advantage is that it doesn’t take any electricity to activate or maintain the tinting, as is necessary with SageGlass, but the down side is that it isn’t controllable by building occupants.There may be times when you want sunlight in the building or views to the outdoors even when significant heat gain will occur. Also, there may be some weird results if there’s a shadow on a portion of a window, resulting in only part of the glass being darkened.The company claims that the product will become available in March 2010, and they are providing prototype glazing for an installation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. As with SageGlass, RavenBrick will sell product to window manufacturers, rather than producing windows themselves. RavenBrick’s president told me that the cost will be about $25 per square foot—somewhat lower than SageGlass. It could be a great product; I’ll be watching the test installation carefully.I invite you to share your comments on this blog. You can also follow my musings on Twitter. Last week I wrote about one of the innovative building materials that I saw at this year’s Greenbuild Conference in Phoenix (phase-change drywall). This week, I’ll cover a very different innovation from the conference: dynamic window glazing.Windows provide some important functions in houses: admitting natural daylight, allowing views to the outdoors, letting in fresh air, and protecting against unwanted heat loss and gain. How effectively they do all this depends mostly on the glazings (usually glass, but sometimes plastic, or a combination of glass and plastic). Energy performance can be significantly improved by adding multiple layers of glazing separated by sealed air spaces, by using special low-emissivity (low-e) coatings on the glazing, by using tinted glass that blocks unwanted solar heat gain, or by using low-conductivity gas fill, such as argon and krypton, that slows the movement of heat through the space between layers of glass. Cutting-Edge Windows that Can Be Tinted on DemandSmart Glass Maker Opens New PlantGBA Encyclopedia: SkylightsGBA Product Guide: Wasco SageGlass SkylightsGBA Product Guide: SageGlass Insulated Glass Unitcenter_img RELATED ARTICLES last_img read more

Remove Dust or Dead Pixels from Footage with This Masking Trick

first_imgHow to Remove Dust in Post (Method 1)I have two methods for fixing this problem. Method one is pretty simple and can usually fix the really small specks that catch your eye.1. The first step is to apply a Gaussian blur to your footage.2. Afterward, go into your effects panel and create a mask for the layer.  Make the mask into the shape of a circle that covers up the dirt.3. If necessary, you can adjust the scale of the effect by shifting the expansion size under your effects panel. For this method to work, you need to make sure this effect is over the dirt in your footage.Quick Tip: You can make this effect more subtle by feathering the edges of your mask.How to Remove Dust in Post (Method 2)The next trick works pretty well, and depending on your footage, you can improve the picture quality anywhere from 70 – 90 percent. Here’s how it works.1. Duplicate your shot, and layer the double above the original.2. On the duplicated video, create a circular mask that fits the same size as the dust particle. The trick is to make this mask right beside the dirt.3. Once you’ve created your small masked layer, go into Motion (under your effects panel) and slide the position of your clip over the affected video.This will patch your original clip with a section of footage from the duplicated video. Essentially, you are creating the photoshop clone stamp effect for video.If done correctly, these two methods can really save some of your shots — and possibly an entire production. Sooner or later, every filmmaker finds dust in their shot — either on the lens or sensor. Here’s how you can get rid of it without sacrificing your footage.One of the worst feelings in the world is finding out that unwanted dirt on your lens has ruined your footage. So how do you get rid of it? Well have no fear — I have a solution. All you’ll need is non-linear editing software and some footage to save.In the following tutorial, I’ll show you how to remove sensor dust in Premiere Pro, but this technique also works in After Effects, FCPX, and other NLEs. last_img read more