The Data Doesn’t Lie: iOS Apps Are Better Than Android

first_imgThe horse race between the app stores has become a tedious exercise. Apple says it has 800,000 apps in the App Store. Google Play is about at 800,000 and is likely to hit the million app benchmark before iOS. But, as our readers so dutifully informed us, they do not really care. App store volume has become a non-story.Quantifying the quality of apps between iOS and Android is a different matter altogether.Quality, by its definition, is a subjective thing. Especially when it comes to mobile apps. People’s opinions are shaded by their affinity for one smartphone or another, choice of mobile operating system and varying brand loyalty. When it comes to Apple and Android, fans of each will scream at each other that their apps are better, more numerous and generally awesome. Who is right? The general perception is that iOS apps in Apple’s App Store are of better quality than their Android counterparts in Google Play. There has been really no way to quantify that though the history of the mobile app ecosystem.Until today. We can finally say, through quantifiable data, that iOS apps on aggregate are of better quality than Android. The Data Doesn’t LieWhat is this, you say? You cannot quantify quality? Well, that is true, to a certain extent. Perception of quality is clouded to an individual’s subjectivity. That did not stop application testing company uTest from setting out to answer the question. Today it released Applause, a service that uses an algorithm to crawl all live apps in the App Store and Google Play to aggregate every app’s ranking and user reviews to determine the quality of an individual app.It is some powerful data and the results are fascinating. Applause ranks every app in 10 categories and gives them an Applause Score of 1 to 100 along 1-0 categories. uTest can then look at average scores for app categories (such as games or media etc.) and yes, entire operating systems. By uTest’s metrics, iOS apps have a mean Applause Score of 68.53. Android apps average Applause score is 63.34. The margin of difference between the two is ~8%. That does not necessarily mean that any individual iOS app is going to be better than its equivalent or similar Android app. Each platform offers unique characteristics that can make the experience better or worse. Upon ReadWrite’s request, the team at uTest took a broad level look at some popular app categories and compared them between the Apple App Store and Android Google Play. As you can see with the chart below, Apple generally comes out ahead in most major categories. Note: Apple and Google do not use a common taxonomy for how they categorize apps. uTest had to map equivalent app categories to each other to come up with comparable rankings. Apps can be listed in two separate categories. Amazon Appstore for Android rankings are not included. Exclusive to ReadWriteAs you can see iOS ranks higher in nine of 11 top app categories (eight if you count weather as a virtual push between the two). Android comes out ahead in productivity and medical apps. While these are not straight one-to-one comparisons, the data is deep enough from a categorical level to give us a good understanding that iOS users are ranking app quality higher than Android counterparts. When developing the algorithm for Applause, uTest was looking for two properties.“We look for two things. One, did it have a statically different bearing on the perceived app quality, the level of user satisfaction. Second, did the keywords or key phrases that we are crawling intuitively fit into this bucket. So, for performance for example, there are really clean words like crash or freeze or hang,” uTest’s Matt Johnston said. Case StudiesFor a straighter one-to-one comparison, we asked uTest for a few case studies to highlight the difference in rankings between iOS and Android for the same app. We asked specifically that uTest compare social tablet magazine reader Zite because of its popularity and significant difference between iOS and Android versions. If you are a Zite user on iOS and Android, you know that the two are distinctly different experiences. Zite first came to the iPad before spreading to the iPhone and Android smartphones. The app may serve you the same content across operating systems, but it by no means the same experience. Zite’s iOS ranking was 66. For Android it is 62. For iOS, Zite ranks at or above the mean Applause Score in nearly every category. It ranks high in content (as it should) and well above the average in privacy. Zite’s iOS Applause Score is not surprising given that it is a well-liked app used by millions who are likely to review it kindly.Zite Applause Score for iOSZite Applause Score for AndroidThe Android app is a different story. It ranks below the mean Android Applause Score is six of 10 categories, besting the average in only content, privacy and security. An app that performs better on Android would be CBS Sports Fantasy Baseball. This is an app I use with regularity and, have to admit, it is not terrific on either platforms. Its Android score is a 12 while its iOS score is a six. Neither version hits the mean in any single category, but the Android version does perform better in staple metrics such as usability and performance. CBS Fantasy Baseball Applause Score for AndroidTrusting The Algorithm?The bottom line is that we have to step back and assess whether we trust uTest’s Applause algorithm to determine quality on both the broad and granular levels.Essentially, you are putting your trust in two things: the wisdom of the crowds (the reviewers on Google Play and the Apple App Store) and Applause’s ability to measure the subjective nature of such reviews. On its surface, the Applause algorithm is a fairly simple concept. It crawls and looks for key words that are relevant to certain categories (like “crash” for performance etc.) and has the ability to exclude certain comments in the case of astroturfing or black hat review tactics. Tags:#Android#App Economy#iOS dan rowinski What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts center_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Police head constable beaten to death in Rajasthan

first_imgA police head constable was beaten to death in Rajasthan’s Rajsamand district on Saturday, police said. Abdul Gani, who was posted at the Bhim Police Station, had gone to Hamela ki Ber village while investigating a case.“He was returning from the village on his motorcycle when some 4-5 unidentified persons attacked him with sticks,” Superintendent of Police Bhuvan Bhushan said. He was rushed to a hospital in Bhim area where he succumbed to injuries. Postmortem will be conducted on Sunday, he said, adding that efforts were being made to identify those involved.last_img

9 months agoNewcastle keeper Dubravka shuts down Juventus links

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Newcastle keeper Dubravka shuts down Juventus linksby Freddie Taylor9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United manager Martin Dubravka has expressed his happiness at St. James’ Park amid speculation linking him with a move to Juventus.The Slovakian has been excellent for Toon over the past 12 months, which has lead to the Old Lady keeping an eye on his performances.But Dubravka insists he is happy on Tyneside.”I am very happy here. To be honest I am completely focused on my job here and that is what I am concentrating on right now,” Dubravka told Chronicle Live.”I know a lot of people have been asking me if I will stay or not, but I am happy now and I am not thinking about any other club.” last_img read more

a month agoChelsea manager Lampard: Abraham not guaranteed spot

first_imgChelsea manager Lampard: Abraham not guaranteed spotby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea manager Frank Lampard says he won’t stop pushing Tammy Abraham.The 21-year-old scored a hat-trick in Saturday’s 5-2 win over Wolves.It was Abraham now has seven goals from five Premier League appearances, but Lampard has warned he must keep scoring to keep his place.He said:”I felt that knowing his abilities and watching him in the Championship have two great seasons and in the Premier League, I felt it was more than time for him to have his opportunity,” Chelsea boss Lampard said of Abraham.”He needed to show it in pre-season and at the start of the season, hence he started at Manchester United.”I have competition up there. I definitely don’t want to down-talk Giroud and Batshuayi because we need them as well and Batshuayi looked sharp when he came on and Oli always gives something of a high level, so it was up to Tammy to show it.”I’ve got confidence in him and I’m prepared to give him chances, but even more now I’ll be tougher on him because he’s shown what he can do. So the moment he wants to come off that and think that goals will just drop at his feet will be a moment when maybe he will be rested, so it’s important he makes sure he stays on his game.”I’m happy because I see him every day with a feeling like he wants to play every day, to score goals every day and that’s something a bit special. You don’t see that in all young players and it’s a great gift in him.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Costly citrus Floridas decimated crops could send prices climbing

first_imgVANCOUVER – The price of a mimosa at brunch or bag of oranges at the grocery store may jump in the coming weeks, experts say, after hurricane Irma left some of the state’s citrus producers completely depleted.“If you take a big chunk out of our supply, it means that prices are going to go up,” said Michael von Massow, an associate professor at the University of Guelph.Hurricane Irma led to dozens of deaths in the Caribbean and southeastern United States, and left more than one million homes and businesses without power in Florida.“It is devastating. It has decimated our industry,” said Adam Putnam, the state’s commissioner of agriculture, at a Florida citrus commission meeting last week.“The path of this storm could not have been any worse for Florida agriculture and Florida citrus, specifically.”In the state’s south-west, about 70 to 100 per cent of orange crops were lost, he said.Before the hurricane, the Florida Department of Citrus expected more than 75 million boxes worth of oranges on the trees this season, said executive director Shannon Shepp in a statement.Now, she said, they have “much less.”Last year, Canada imported nearly nine-million kilograms of oranges worth more than $10 million from Florida, according to Statistics Canada. The country also brought in about $39 million worth of orange juice, according to Agriculture and Agri-food Canada.So far, Joe Siegal has been ordering oranges from California for his company Hilite Fine Foods Inc., a Toronto-based wholesale produce supplier.But in about two to three weeks, Siegal said, he would typically start ordering the fruit from Florida and that’s when he expects citrus prices will rise.“Once we need them, then the problem will start.”Von Massow estimates the price hike will be more than five pre cent, but is likely to happen gradually.Companies won’t want to bump prices too much and tempt budget-conscious consumers to switch to other alternatives — like apples or apple juice, he said.Once people shift to another product, it’s hard to bring them back even if prices eventually fall, said von Massow, who teaches University of Guelph’s food, agricultural and resource economics department.It could be even tougher considering orange juice has been falling out of favour as a beverage of choice for some time now, he said, as lifestyle changes, for example, mean fewer people sit down for a traditional breakfast most days.Also unclear is for how long oranges and orange juice will be more expensive, as the full extent of the damage is still unknown.“We don’t know what the long-term damage to these trees (is),” said von Massow.If farmers have to replant trees, the supply shortage could extend well beyond one season, he added.For Siegal, one thing is clear as the world grapples with climate change: “The produce industry is really going to be changing.”More produce will be grown under glass, he said, adding he’s increasingly asking his tomato grower to build more greenhouses. Produce grown in greenhouses provides the peace of mind of nearly guaranteed supply and quality, Siegal said, rather than fighting volatile climates.“We just can’t keep going on like this.”Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.last_img read more

Move Up Here community recruitment program wins award

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The BC Economic Development Association (BCEDA) awarded the City of Fort St. John with the Economic Development Marketing Innovation Award for the ‘Move Up Here’ recruitment program.The ‘Move up Here’ program was created in partnership with local businesses and organizations as a way to help recruit skilled professionals to FSJ. The program shares resource-based information in a visually appealing way to draw newcomers to the north.Businesses have access to share this free program giving potential new workers more information on opportunities in the area and the benifits of living in the north. “To be recognized by the BCEDA for our Move Up Here recruitment program is a tremendous honour and speaks to the quality and effectiveness of the materials created,” stated Acting Mayor Lilia Hansen.Businesses wishing to use the ‘Move Up Here’ program materials are can contact the Strategic Services department at 250.787.8150 or [email protected] view more on ‘Move Up Here’; CLICK HERElast_img read more

Fort St John Chamber Joins Coalition regarding Caribou section 11 draft agreement

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John and District Chamber of Commerce has joined a list of BC Chambers in a Coalition to support the petition started by Dawson Creek Chamber.The FSJ Chamber of Commerce goes on to say that although the FSJ area is not directly affected by the current Caribou closure plans in section 11, it’s the unintended effects that will impact all communities within the region and all around the province that is of the greatest concern.Section 11 sets out the overall relationship between BC and Canada, and it gives a sense of where the recovery process may go. Section 11 currently identifies 54 herds across the province and leaves a lot of questions around what potential land management could look like shared the FSJ Chamber of Commerce. Concerns regarding this online form have since surfaced by many Chambers, calling it cumbersome, very lengthy and convoluted. Some Chambers have taken the measures to offer open house events to walk participants through the online forms to ensure they are understanding them completely.“We stand with our Chamber of Commerce organizations throughout our province in appealing to the BC Government to hit pause on the negotiations. The debates in the public sphere over the proposed caribou recovery program have really highlighted that proper engagement with land users and other stakeholders has not been completed, and the process taken for consultation has not been communicated well. The consultation seems rushed. Without a full understanding of the depth of the issues, how can the residents of BC ensure that all the potential impacts of the program have been considered?” responds Julie Ziebart – Chair of the Advocacy Committee, FSJ Chamber of Commerce. “Meaningful economic and social analyses is critical to working with communities and sectors so that decisions are fully informed and reflect the entire scope of the impact. ” Says Christopher Flury, Fort St. John and District Chamber of Commerce, President.In November 2018 the Dawson Creek Chamber demanded socio-economic Impact Assessments for the North East region prior to finalization of Section 11 and Partnership Agreements on Caribou Recovery.On April 10th, 2019, the petition was delivered to the house with over 35,000 signatures demanding that all negotiations halt immediately and the Provincial Government negotiation teams and all government agencies:1) Consult openly with ALL users, stakeholders, businesses, and local government2) Immediately begin economic and socio-economic impact studies on the North Eastregion3) Provide baseline data on populations and relevant science-based studies to supportclosures and recovery plans.In November 2018, the Concerned Citizens for Caribou Recovery group, led by the Dawson Creek Chamber of Commerce has been actively working to bring the issues identified with section 11 to the public, government and key stakeholders. The group has been actively working to bring to light the socio-economic impacts that section 11 (in its current form) could bring to the Province.Public Consultations did not happen until now when the Provincial Government (afterincreased pressure) opened up their consultation to public comment at the end of March 2019 with a deadline to submit comments by May 3rd, 2019. The public can submit their feedback through the government’s online feedback form found at engage.gov.bc.ca/caribou.last_img read more

Commentary Buckeyes offense facing identity crisis

As the football program’s annual Spring Game inches closer, the two sides of the ball could not be farther apart, in both play and identity. Take Saturday’s scrimmage for example. In 17 possessions, the offense managed just three Drew Basil field goals. The four quarterbacks taking snaps in place of injured starter Terrelle Pryor looked mundane at best. Taylor Graham was the only one without a turnover. That’s not exactly vintage “Tressel Ball.” The receivers helped account for some of those turnovers, dropping passes that turned into picks. The discrepancy between returning starter DeVier Posey and the rest of the receiving corps appears to be wide. Now, the offense does have a handful of legitimate reasons for its struggles on Saturday: Pryor’s injury, starting right tackle J.B. Shugarts’ absence because of a shoulder injury, two new starting guards and too many new faces catching the ball. But the defense, which is replacing seven starters, sure wasn’t offering any excuses. Its play did the talking from the first snap, when the offense started from its own three-yard line. At the snap, defensive linemen John Simon and Johnathan Hankins slammed through the point of attack and stopped running back Dan Herron in the end zone. The “Silver Bullets” weren’t finished causing havoc quite yet. Cornerback Bradley Roby had two interceptions. Running back Jaamal Berry was crushed by cornerback Dionte Allen on a bubble screen. And on a single play, Simon sacked quarterback Kenny Guiton, forced him to fumble and then recovered the ball for a triple crown of sorts. The defense even appears to have found its director in Etienne Sabino, who seems to have finally seized the opportunity. “(Sabino) is definitely our leader right now in the middle of the field,” cornerback Travis Howard said. “He’s the guy calling all the plays and making all the checks.” Not all is lost for the offense. It appears to have a three-headed monster of running backs up to the challenge, each of whom brings something different to the table. Berry has the speed, Jordan Hall has the shiftiness and Rod Smith packs the Beanie Wells-like power. It’s no secret that the program has been engulfed in a storm of controversy during the offseason. Heck, it couldn’t even finish the scrimmage because a howling thunderstorm showed up in the ‘Shoe. So, whether it’s the offense finding its identity or the defense continuing to assert its own, it’s clear the team has a long road ahead. Lucky for the Buckeyes, it’s spring, not autumn, so they have plenty of time to weather the storm. read more

Source of money given to 3 suspended Buckeyes remains unclear

The numbers aren’t adding up for sophomore Corey Brown, junior running back Jordan Hall and defensive back Travis Howard, who each received $200 at a charity event and will now miss their second consecutive game for Ohio State. The source of the money received by the three players remains unclear, according to documents that were released by the athletic department on Thursday evening. One former member of the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions declined to comment on the specifics of OSU’s recent suspensions, but did say that similar circumstances could lead to a new NCAA investigation.  Brown, Hall and Howard’s name are redacted in the NCAA and university documents that were released, but the documents did say that interviews with current student-athletes revealed that they were invited to attend the charity event by former student-athletes whose names are also redacted. There are also discrepancies among the players regarding who they received money from and why they were receiving it. Two players said believed they were receiving money for working the event while the third player said he was receiving money from a former student athlete, according to the documents. In a letter dated Sept. 1, Doug Archie, OSU’s associate athletic director for compliance, said to Jennifer Henderson, the NCAA’s director of student-athlete reinstatement: “All of the current student-athletes incorrectly believed that their participation in the event had been approved by the OSU compliance office. The OSU compliance office did not approve participation in the… 2011 event, but did approve the same event (in 2007 and 2010). “Please note that there was nothing impermissible about the event.” At least two parties also indicated that one party involved in the money exchange was seen carrying several envelopes during the charity event.  Josephine Potuto, a University of Nebraska professor in constitutional law, served on the NCAA Committee on Infractions from 2006–08 and chaired the committee in 2007 and 2008. Potuto would not comment on any specific facet of OSU’s recent suspensions, but did say that, generally, it was unlikely that the NCAA would admit further evidence against a university after a hearing has been held. OSU held its hearing with the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions on Aug. 12 and is still awaiting the committee’s final ruling. “Any violation committed by an individual student-athlete is also an institutional matter because institutions only deal through people,” Potuto said. “So, another investigation could be opened. Generally, the NCAA and the Committee on Infractions won’t re-open a case after it has held a hearing with the institution. “ Mike Doss, a safety for the Buckeyes from 1999-2002 and member of OSU’s 2002 consensus national championship team, was preparing for his Friday induction into the university’s athletics hall of fame moments before the athletic department announced the continuation of the three players’ suspensions. Doss said he wished the current OSU squad well despite its recent troubles. “I hope they do great,” he said. “I hope they win them all and knock them down and show the country that, no matter who’s the head coach, there’s still great football in Columbus, Ohio.” From from his Twitter account, @Jordan_Hall7, Hall said at approximately 8:30p.m. Friday, “Killin’ me not to be out there ..good luck to all my homies tho.” The Buckeyes continue their season on Saturday with a noon game against Toledo at Ohio Stadium. read more

Chemical Warfare Units to Leave Aberdeen

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR A battalion responsible for handling chemical and biological hazards began its relocation from Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Friday with a casing ceremony.Two companies of the 22nd CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear) Battalion will be moving to Fort Bliss, Texas; one company will move to Fort Hood, Texas; and a fourth will go to Fort Stewart, Ga. A fifth company based at Fort Drum will remain at the New York post.In total, 266 soldiers will be relocating from Aberdeen by July 2017. The battalion has been based at the proving ground since World War II.The realignment to Forces Command installations is intended to improve support for maneuver forces, reported the Baltimore Sun.“Re-stationing the 22nd CBRN Battalion better enables our units to train with and support our Army divisions and ensures the 20th CBRNE [Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives] Command can provide the Department of the Army and combatant commanders with ready, reliable and globally responsive forces,” Brig. Gen. William King IV, commanding general of the 20th CBRNE, said in a statement.Each company under the 22nd Battalion is responsible for “technical escort,” which involves providing “advice, assessment, sampling, detection, verification, render-safe, packaging, and escort of chemical and biological devices or hazards, biological surveillance and limited consequence management support to military forces or civilian authorities,” said Maj. Ryan Donald, spokesperson for the 20th CBRNE Command.About 300 soldiers assigned to the 20th Command will remain at Aberdeen, Donald said.last_img read more